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Current Oncology Reports

, 19:59 | Cite as

Pathology of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the Female Genital Tract

  • Brooke E. Howitt
  • Paul Kelly
  • W. Glenn McCluggageEmail author
Gynecologic Cancers (NS Reed, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Gynecologic Cancers

Abstract

Neuroendocrine tumours are uncommon or rare at all sites in the female genital tract. The 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) Classification of neuroendocrine tumours of the endometrium, cervix, vagina and vulva has been updated with adoption of the terms low-grade neuroendocrine tumour and high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma. In the endometrium and cervix, high-grade neoplasms are much more prevalent than low-grade and are more common in the cervix than the corpus. In the ovary, low-grade tumours are more common than high-grade carcinomas and the term carcinoid tumour is still used in WHO 2014. The term ovarian small-cell carcinoma of pulmonary type is included in WHO 2014 for a tumour which in other organs is termed high small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Neuroendocrine tumours at various sites within the female genital tract often occur in association with other neoplasms and more uncommonly in pure form.

Keywords

Ovary Uterus Endometrium Cervix Neuroendocrine carcinoma Neuroendocrine tumour Immunohistochemistry 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Brooke E. Howitt, Paul Kelly, and W. Glenn McCluggage declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brooke E. Howitt
    • 1
  • Paul Kelly
    • 2
    • 3
  • W. Glenn McCluggage
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Division of Women’s and Perinatal PathologyBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyBelfast Health and Social Care TrustBelfastUK
  3. 3.Department of PathologyRoyal Group of Hospitals TrustBelfastUK

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