Utility of Environmental Exposure Unit Challenge Protocols for the Study of Allergic Rhinitis Therapies

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This paper explores how the Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU) experimental model can be used to further our understanding of pharmacotherapies and immunotherapies for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR).

Recent Findings

EEUs are used increasingly for the study of combination therapies, immunotherapies, and novel AR treatments. A combined antihistamine/corticosteroid nasal spray formulation was seen to have a faster onset of action relative to the therapies individually in the Environmental Exposure Chamber. House dust mite sublingual immunotherapy tablets are both safe and efficacious as evaluated by the Vienna Challenge Chamber. The Kingston EEU found that a novel peptide-based immunotherapy approach to be effective in reducing grass pollen-induced AR. Lastly, nasal filters were determined to reduce seasonal AR symptoms, given out-of-season in the Denmark Environmental Exposure Unit.

Summary

EEUs are controlled, replicable models that provide valuable insight into the efficacy, onset and duration of action, and dose-related impacts of AR therapeutics, with direct clinical relevance.

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Correspondence to Anne K. Ellis.

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Conflict of Interest

Dr. Ellis has participated in advisory boards for ALK Abello, AstraZeneca, Aralez, Bausch Health, Circassia Ltd., GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Mylan, Novartis, Pediapharm, and Pfizer, has been a speaker for ALK, Aralez, AstraZeneca, Boerhinger-Ingleheim, CACME, Meda, Mylan, Merck, Novartis, Pediapharm, Pfizer, The ACADEMY, and Takeda. Her institution has received research grants from Bayer LLC, Circassia Ltd., Green Cross Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline, Sun Pharma, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Regeneron, and Sanofi. She has also served as an independent consultant to Allergy Therapeutics, Bayer LLC, Ora Inc., and Regeneron in the past. The other authors declare no conflicts of interest relevant to this manuscript.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Rhinitis, Conjunctivitis, and Sinusitis

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Hossenbaccus, L., Steacy, L.M., Walker, T. et al. Utility of Environmental Exposure Unit Challenge Protocols for the Study of Allergic Rhinitis Therapies. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 20, 34 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11882-020-00922-8

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Keywords

  • Environmental Exposure Unit
  • Allergic rhinitis
  • Allergen specific immunotherapy
  • Nasal corticosteroids
  • Antihistamine
  • Therapy