An animal model of faecal incontinence and sacral neuromodulation

Review Article
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Abstract

The pudendal nerves can be injured during traumatic vaginal childbirth and result in faecal incontinence. Some of these incontinent patients benefit from chronic sacral neuromodulation and the mechanism of action of this therapy has been a focus of many studies. In 2008, a rodent model of neuropathic faecal incontinence was introduced and subsequently validated through a series of investigations. This review summarizes the decade-long contribution of Professor Ronan O’Connell to the inception and application of this rodent model of faecal incontinence and sacral neuromodulation.

Keywords

Animal model Faecal incontinence Rat Sacral neuromodulation 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The author received research funding from the company Medtronic Inc. for some of the studies described in this review.

Ethical approval

All applicable international, national and institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anatomy, School of Medicine, Health Science CentreUniversity College DublinDublin 4Ireland

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