Review of Random Walk in Image Processing

  • Zhaobin Wang
  • Lijie Guo
  • Shuai Wang
  • Lina Chen
  • Hao Wang
Original Paper
  • 274 Downloads

Abstract

The random walk, proposed in 1905, was applied into the field of computer vision in 1979. Subsequently, more and more researchers paid their attention to this new method. Recently it has become prevailing as to be widely applied in image processing, e.g. image segmentation, image fusion, image enhancement and so on. Until now there is no comprehensive review on random walk in image processing yet. Therefore, almost important references are reviewed in the paper, and six representative random walk models have been listed and explained in detail. And then their applications of random walk in image processing are introduced. At last, some existed problems and future work are pointed out.

Keywords

Random walk Image processing Image smoothing Image segmentation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was jointly supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61201421), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M532097).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© CIMNE, Barcelona, Spain 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhaobin Wang
    • 1
  • Lijie Guo
    • 1
  • Shuai Wang
    • 1
  • Lina Chen
    • 1
  • Hao Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information Science and EngineeringLanzhou UniversityLanzhouChina

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