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Applied Geophysics

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 431–440 | Cite as

Three-dimensional arbitrarily anisotropic modeling for time-domain airborne electromagnetic surveys

  • Wei Huang
  • Fang Ben
  • Chang-Chun Yin
  • Qing-Min Meng
  • Wen-Jie Li
  • Gui-Xiang Liao
  • Shan Wu
  • Yong-Zai Xi
Electrical & electromagnetic methods

Abstract

Electrically anisotropic strata are abundant in nature, so their study can help our data interpretation and our understanding of the processes of geodynamics. However, current data processing generally assumes isotropic conditions when surveying anisotropic structures, which may cause discrepancies between reality and electromagnetic data interpretation. Moreover, the anisotropic interpretation of the time-domain airborne electromagnetic (TDAEM) method is still confined to one dimensional (1D) cases, and the corresponding three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations are still in development. In this study, we expanded the 3D TDAEM modeling of arbitrarily anisotropic media. First, through coordinate rotation of isotropic conductivity, we obtained the conductivity tensor of an arbitrary anisotropic rock. Next, we incorporated this into Maxwell’s equations, using a regular hexahedral grid of vector finite elements to subdivide the solution area. A direct solver software package provided the solution for the sparse linear equations that resulted. Analytical solutions were used to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the algorithm. The proven model was then applied to analyze the effects of arbitrary anisotropy in 3D TDAEM via the distribution of responses and amplitude changes, which revealed that different anisotropy situations strongly affected the responses of TDAEM.

Keywords

Three-dimensional time-domain airborne electromagnetic arbitrary anisotropy vector finite element 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Teacher Liu Yun-He and Dr. Ren Xiu-Yan for their advice and suggestions. We want to thank all reviewers and editors for their constructive comments and suggestions, which greatly improved the clarity of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Editorial Office of Applied Geophysics and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Huang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Fang Ben
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chang-Chun Yin
    • 2
  • Qing-Min Meng
    • 1
  • Wen-Jie Li
    • 1
  • Gui-Xiang Liao
    • 1
  • Shan Wu
    • 1
  • Yong-Zai Xi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Geophysical and Geochemical ExplorationChinese Academy of Geological ScienceLangfangChina
  2. 2.College of Geo-exploration Sciences and TechnologyJilin UniversityChangchunChina
  3. 3.Laboratory of geophysical Electromagnetic Probing TechnologiesMinistry of land and ResourcesLangfangChina

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