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Obesity Surgery

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 1136–1137 | Cite as

Letter to the Editor: Influence of Intestinal Microbiota on Body Weight Gain: a Narrative Review of the Literature

  • Andre Alonso Taco-Masias
  • Augusto Rafael Fernandez-Aristi
Letter to the Editor

Dear editor of Obesity Surgery,

We have read with interest the review article written by Cardinelli et al., where the microbiota’s mechanisms, which influence weight gain, are addressed [1].

We consider that this approach provides important information on the current role of intestinal microbiota in weight regulation and we think that this knowledge is highly relevant to understand the impact made on this bacterial community when a surgery, that disrupts the gastrointestinal tract, is performed on an obese patient and how this affects the energy balance and weight changes.

Nevertheless, we would like to add some topics that are crucial for understanding how the gut microbiota is related to the changes in the energy metabolism, which we think was not fully addressed in the article.

The article only explains the effect of the SREBP-1 on the lipid metabolism and the effects of the SREBP-2 were not addressed. On this matter, a study by Caesar et al. [2] performed on two groups of mice fed...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

For this type of study, formal consent is not required.

Human and Animal Rights

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Does not apply.

References

  1. 1.
    Cardinelli C, Sala P, Alves C, et al. Influence of intestinal microbiota on body weight gain: a narrative review of the literature. Obes Surg. 2015;25(2):346–53.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-014-1525-2.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Caesar R, Nygren H, Oresic M, et al. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism. J Lipid Res. 2016;57(3):474–81.  https://doi.org/10.1194/jlr.M065847.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Xu X, So J, Park J, et al. Transcriptional control of hepatic lipid metabolism by SREBP and ChREBP. Semin Liver Dis. 2013;33(4):301–11.  https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1358523.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Uno K, Seki Y, Kasama K, et al. A comparison of the bariatric procedures that are performed in the treatment of super morbid obesity. Obes Surg. 2017;27(10):2537–45.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-017-2685-7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Medina D, Pedreros J, Turiel D, et al. Distinct patterns in the gut microbiota after surgical or medical therapy in obese patients. Peer J. 2017;5:e3443.  https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3443.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Tremaroli V, Karlsson F, Werling M, et al. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and vertical banded Gastroplasty induce long-term changes on the human gut microbiome contributing to fat mass regulation. Cell Metab. 2015;22(2):228–38.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.009.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andre Alonso Taco-Masias
    • 1
  • Augusto Rafael Fernandez-Aristi
    • 1
  1. 1.School of medicineUniversidad Peruana De Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC)LimaPeru

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