The responses of carbon- and nitrogen-acquiring enzymes to nitrogen and phosphorus additions in two plantations in southern China

Abstract

In tropical plantations, nutrients such as nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) are often applied as management practices. However, the effects of such nutrient additions on topsoil C- and N-acquiring enzymes activities are unclear. In this study, the impacts of fertilization on β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), β-D-cellobiosidase (CBH), β-1,4-xylosidase (BX), β-1,4-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine amino peptidase (LAP) enzymes activities from topsoil and litter layer of two tropical plantations (Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus urophylla) were measured. The results showed that N addition had neutral impact on topsoil enzymes, while significantly elevating the activities of BG, CBH, BX, and NAG in the litter layer. P fertilization had no impacts except for an elevation of NAG in litter sample. There was no interactions found between N and P additions on these enzyme activities. The clearer impacts of N over P fertilization were unexpected because that the study site receives a high rate of atmospheric N deposition, and has low soil P availability. The impact of P fertilization on hydrolytic enzyme activities may be less important compared with that of N.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Shengxing Fu and Meifang Hu for their support for the field work. We acknowledge the two anonymous reviewers for providing helpful comments on an initial version of this manuscript. This study was financially supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31670488, 41650110484, and 41731176), Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad (28.601), and a Grant from The Sumitomo Foundation (153082).

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Correspondence to Wei Zhang.

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Project Funding: This study was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31670488, 41650110484, and 41731176), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Provine (No. 2017A030313168), Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad (28.601), and a grant from The Sumitomo Foundation (153082).

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Corresponding editor: Chai Ruihai.

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Wang, S., Mori, T., Mo, J. et al. The responses of carbon- and nitrogen-acquiring enzymes to nitrogen and phosphorus additions in two plantations in southern China. J. For. Res. 31, 1319–1324 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11676-019-00905-0

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Keywords

  • Tropical tree plantation
  • Ecoenzymes
  • Fertilization
  • Forest management