Advertisement

Biomass increment and mortality losses in tropical secondary forests of Hainan, China

  • Junfu Zhao
  • Chunsheng He
  • Chunlin Qi
  • Xu Wang
  • Haiyan Deng
  • Chunxin Wang
  • Haiwei Liu
  • Lianyan Yang
  • Zhenghong Tan
Original Paper
  • 49 Downloads

Abstract

Secondary forests, created after heavy logging, are an important part of China’s forests. We investigated forest biomass and its accumulation rate in 38 plots in a tropical secondary forest on Hainan Island. These secondary forests are moderate carbon sinks, averaging 1.96–2.17 t C ha−1 a−1. Biomass increment is largely by medium-sized (10–35 m) trees. Tree mortality accounts for almost 30% of the biomass and plays a negligible role in biomass accumulation estimates. Mortality rate is highly dependent on tree size. For small trees and seedlings, it is related to competition due to elevated irradiance after logging. Regarding prospective biomass and rates of accumulation, recovery is not as rapid as in secondary forests of cleared land. Therefore, tropical forests are susceptible to logging operations and need careful forest management.

Keywords

Tropical secondary forest management Carbon sink Inventory Dynamic plot Logging 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The C-project Excellent Talent Project of Hainan University and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 31200347) supported this study.

References

  1. Baker TR, Phillips OL, Malhi Y, Almeida S, Arroyo L, Fiore AD et al (2004) Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots. Philos Trans R Soc B Biol Sci 359:353–365CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berry NJ, Phillips OL, Lewis SL, Hill JK, Edwards DP, Tawatao NB, Ahmad N, Magintan D, Khen CV, Maryati M, Ong RC, Hamer KC (2010) The high value of logged tropical forests: lessons from northern Borneo. Biodivers Conserv 19:985–997CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brown S, Gillespie AJR, Lugo AR (1989) Biomass estimation methods for tropical forests with applications to forest inventory data. For Sci 35:881–902Google Scholar
  4. Brown S, Lugo AE (1990) Tropical secondary forests. J Trop Ecol 6:1–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chen DX, Li YD, Liu HP, Xu H, Xiao WF, Luo TS, Zhou Z, Lin MX (2010) Biomass and carbon dynamics of a tropical mountain rain forest in China. Sci China Ser C Life Sci 53:798–810CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Clark DA, Brown S, Kicklighter DW, Chambers JQ, ThomlinsonNi JR, Ni J (2001) Measuring net primary production in forests: concepts and field methods. Ecol Appl 11:356–370CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Feng Z, Zheng Z, Zhang J, Cao M, Sha L, Deng J (1998) Biomass and its allocation of a tropical wet seasonal rain forest in Xishuangbanna, China. Acta Phytoecol Sin 22:481–488Google Scholar
  8. Figueira AMS, Miller SD, de Sousa CAD, Menton MC, Maia AR, da Rocha HR, Goulden ML (2008) Effects of selective logging on tropical forest tree growth. J Geophys Res 113:G00B05.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2007jg000577
  9. Gower ST, Kucharik CJ, Norman JM (1999) Direct and indirect estimation of leaf area index, F (APAR), and net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote Sens Environ 70:29–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hu Y (1997) The dipterocarp forest of Hainan island, China. J Trop For Sci 9:477–498Google Scholar
  11. King DA, Davies SJ, Noor NSM (2006) Growth and mortality are related to adult tree size in a Malaysian mixed dipterocarp forest. For Ecol Manag 223:152–158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kira T, Ogawa H, Yoda K, Ogino K (1967) Comparative ecological studies on three main types of forest vegetation in Thailand. IV. Dry matter production, with special reference to the Khao Chong rain forest. Nat Life Southeast Asia 5:149–174Google Scholar
  13. Lasco RD, MacDicken KG, Pulhin FB, Guillermo IQ, Sales RF, Cruz RVO (2006) Carbon stocks assessment of a selectively logged dipterocarp forest and wood processing mill in the Phillipines. J Trop For Sci 18:166–172Google Scholar
  14. Lewis SL, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Sonke B, Affum-Baffoe K, Baker TR, Ojo LQ (2009) Increasing carbon storage in intact African tropical forests. Nature 457:1003–1006CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Li Y (1993) Comparative analysis for biomass measurement of tropical mountain rain forest in Hainan Island, China. Acta Ecol Sin 13:313–320Google Scholar
  16. Lieberman D, Lieberman M, Peralta R, Hartshorn GS (1985) Mortality patterns and stand turnover rates in a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica. J Ecol 73:915–924CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Miller SD, Goulden ML, Hutyra LR, Keller M, Saleska SR, Wofsy SC, Figueira AMS, da Rochar HR, de Camargo PB (2011) Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America, 108, 19431v19435Google Scholar
  18. Niklas KJ (1994) Plant allometry: the scaling of form and processes. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  19. Ogawa H, Yoda K, Kira T (1965) Comparative ecological studies on three main type of forest vegetation in Thailand. II. Plant biomass. Nat Life Southeast Asia 4:49–80Google Scholar
  20. Pinard MA, Cropper WP (2000) Simulated effects of logging on carbon storage in dipterocarp forest. J Appl Ecol 37:267–283CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pinard MA, Putz FE (1996) Retaining forest biomass by reduced logging damage. Biotropica 28(3):278–295CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Russell CE (1983) Nutrient cycling and productivity of native and plantation forests at Jari Florestal, Para, Brazil. Doctoral thesis, University of Georgia. University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, MIGoogle Scholar
  23. Saldarriaga JG, West DC, Tharp ML, Uhl C (1988) Long-term chronosequence of forest succession in the Upper Rio Negro of Colombia and Venezuela. J Ecol 76:938–958CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Salomão RP, Nepstad DC, Vieira IC (1996) Biomass and structure of tropical forests and the greenhouse effect. Ciencia Hoje 21:38–47Google Scholar
  25. Tan ZH, Deng XB, Hughes A, Tang Y, Cao M, Zhang WF, Wang XF, Sha LQ, Song L, Zhao JF (2015) Partial net primary production of a mixed dipterocarp forest: spatial patterns and temporal dynamics. J Geophys Res Biogeosci 120:570–583CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Tang JW, Zhang JH, Song QS, Cao M, Feng ZL (1998) A preliminary study on the biomass of secondary tropical forest in Xishuangbanna. Acta Phytoecol Sin 22(6):489–498Google Scholar
  27. Terakunpisut J, Gajaseni N, Ruankawe N (2007) Carbon sequestration potential in aboveground biomass of Thong Pha Phum national forest, Thailand. Appl Ecol Environ Res 5:93–102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Zheng Z, Liu H, Feng ZL (2006) Biomass of tropical montane rain forest in Xishuangbanna of Southwest China. Chin J Ecol 25:347–353Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junfu Zhao
    • 1
  • Chunsheng He
    • 1
  • Chunlin Qi
    • 1
  • Xu Wang
    • 1
  • Haiyan Deng
    • 2
  • Chunxin Wang
    • 2
  • Haiwei Liu
    • 2
  • Lianyan Yang
    • 1
  • Zhenghong Tan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Tropical Agriculture and ForestryHainan UniversityHaikouChina
  2. 2.National Natural Reserve of DiaoluoshanLingshuiChina

Personalised recommendations