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Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 7, Issue 5, pp 305–310 | Cite as

Fracture Mechanics Determinations of Allowable Crack Size in Railroad Rails

  • R. Ravaee
  • A. Hassani
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Abstract

An evaluation of fatigue behavior of rail steel is necessary to ensure rail transportation safety. Fatigue in these steels was studied with fracture mechanics techniques. The goal of these studies was to find out the appropriate way of preventing a crack from reaching its critical size in the rail. Tests were conducted on rail head, and transverse head cracks were analyzed through damage tolerance concepts. Critical crack size and crack growth characteristics for the rail were determined, and the residual service life was calculated for defective segments of the rails. Additionally, the allowable crack size for different nondestructive testing intervals was determined.

Keywords

Rail Critical crack size Fracture toughness Fatigue crack growth 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringSemnan UniversitySemnanIran

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