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Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 157–160 | Cite as

An Interview with Dr. Karen Jackson

  • Karen E. Jackson
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In a crash, keeping the occupants alive and uninjured is paramount. In order to study the dynamics of an impact, military and general aviation aircraft, like cars, must be tested for their ability to keep their riders safe. A part of Structural Dynamics Branch in the Research and Technology Directorate at NASA Langley, the Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) tests aircraft by crashing them. Dr. Karen Jackson is part of the research team.

NASA Tech Briefs: Explain the Landing and Impact Research Facility, and how does it fit into NASA?

Dr. Karen Jackson: The facility has had a long history. It was originally built in the early 1960s, and was used as a lunar landing research facility to allow the Apolloastronauts to practice the last 150 feet of descent onto the lunar surface. The surface underneath the gantry was cratered to look like the Moon, and the astronauts would climb up into mock-ups of the Lunar Excursion Module, and then they would practice...

Keywords

Crash Test Technology Directorate General Aviation Typical Crash Umbilical Cable 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© ASM International 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) FacilityNASA Langley Research CenterHamptonUSA

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