Understanding qi running in the meridians as interstitial fluid flowing via interstitial space of low hydraulic resistance

  • Wei-bo Zhang
  • De-xian Jia
  • Hong-yan Li
  • Yu-long Wei
  • Huang Yan
  • Peng-na Zhao
  • Fei-fei Gu
  • Guang-jun Wang
  • Yan-ping Wang
Academic Exploration
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Abstract

Qi, blood and the meridians are fundamental concepts in Chinese medicine (CM), which are components of the human body and maintain physiological function. Pathological changes of qi, blood and meridians may lead to discomfort and disease. Treatment with acupuncture or herbal medicine aims to regulate qi and blood so as to recover normal function of the meridians. This paper explores the nature of qi as well as compares and correlates them with the structures of the human body. We propose a conceptualization of qi as being similar to the interstitial flfl uid, and the meridians as being similar to interstitial space of low hydraulic resistance in the body. Hence, qi running in the meridians can be understood as interstitial fluid flowing via interstitial space of low hydraulic resistance.

Keywords

qi interstitial flfl uid meridian interstitial space low hydraulic resistance 

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Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Chinese Association of the Integration of Traditional and Western Medicine 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei-bo Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • De-xian Jia
    • 1
  • Hong-yan Li
    • 2
  • Yu-long Wei
    • 3
  • Huang Yan
    • 3
  • Peng-na Zhao
    • 1
  • Fei-fei Gu
    • 1
  • Guang-jun Wang
    • 2
  • Yan-ping Wang
    • 3
  1. 1.ENNOVA Health Research InstituteLangfang, HebeiChina
  2. 2.Institute of Acupuncture and MoxibustionChina Academy of Chinese Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.School of Acupuncture, Moxibustion and TuinaBeijing University of Chinese MedicineBeijingChina

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