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Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 419–429 | Cite as

Identification of agricultural systems in the mountains of Northeast Thailand

  • Sukanlaya Choenkwan
  • A. Terry Rambo
Article
  • 34 Downloads

Abstract

Agricultural systems in Thailand’s northeastern mountains are described in terms of their type of crops, marketing channels, and labor requirements. Five distinctive systems are identified: The Field crop system, Fruit tree system, Industrial tree plantation system, Specialty crop system and Agro-tourism system. The different systems are compared with each other in order to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses as development models. The Field crop system covers the largest area of agricultural land and is found in all mountainous villages but it generates very low net profits per hectare. The Specialty crop system and Agro-tourism system generate very high net profits per hectare but cover only a small land area and have a restricted spatial distribution. Expansion of these high value systems may be limited because they are capital and labor intensive and require highly skilled farmers to manage them successfully. If these constraints can be overcome, they may offer a useful model for mountain agricultural development.

Keywords

Agricultural system analysis Specialty crop Agro-tourism Mountain development Agricultural system Agricultural intensification 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper was supported by a scholarship under the Post-doctoral Program from Research Affairs and Graduate School, Khon Kaen University (58227). This research was funded by a fellowship from the Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Program of the Thailand Research Fund (TRF) and a grant from the Division of Research Administration, Khon Kaen University. Additional support was provided by a Thailand Research Fund Basic Research grant (BRG 5680008). We are appreciative of the final editing done by John S. Parsons.

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Program on System Approaches in Agriculture, Faculty of agricultureKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Extension, Faculty of agricultureKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  3. 3.East-West CenterHonoluluUSA

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