Fluctuation of ROS regulates proliferation and mediates inhibition of migration by reducing the interaction between DLC1 and CAV-1 in breast cancer cells

  • Bingwu Yang
  • Wenzhen Zhu
  • Zhaodi Zheng
  • Rongfei Chai
  • Shuhua Ji
  • Guanghui Ren
  • Tingting Liu
  • Zhaojun Liu
  • Taiyu Song
  • Fenglin Li
  • Shan Liu
  • Guorong Li
Article

Abstract

The aim of our present study was to elucidate the effects of up-regulation and down-regulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level on proliferation, migration, and related molecular mechanism. Breast cancer cells were treated by catalase or H2O2. MTT, colony formation assay, and Hoechst/PI staining were used to evaluate proliferation and apoptosis. The level of intracellular ROS was measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate probes. The ability of migration was detected by wound healing. Western blotting and coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) were used to determine the expression of DLC1 and CAV-1 and their interaction. Our data indicated that up-regulation of intracellular ROS induced by H2O2 significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis accompanying G1 cell cycle arrest and elevated expression of p53. For cell migration, either up-regulation or down-regulation of ROS induced migration inhibition with reduction of interaction between DLC1 and CAV-1. Our results suggested that up-regulation of intracellular ROS inhibited proliferation by promoting expression of p53 and induced G1 cycle arrest and apoptosis. Fluctuation of ROS inhibited migration through reducing the interaction between DLC1 and CAV-1.

Keywords

ROS DLC1 CAV-1 Proliferation Migration 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Key Program of Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (ZR2013CZ002), the Special Funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31672377), and the Major Key Technology of Science and Technology in Shandong Province (2015ZDJS04003).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Society for In Vitro Biology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bingwu Yang
    • 1
  • Wenzhen Zhu
    • 1
  • Zhaodi Zheng
    • 1
  • Rongfei Chai
    • 1
  • Shuhua Ji
    • 1
  • Guanghui Ren
    • 1
  • Tingting Liu
    • 1
  • Zhaojun Liu
    • 1
  • Taiyu Song
    • 1
  • Fenglin Li
    • 1
  • Shan Liu
    • 1
  • Guorong Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life SciencesShandong Normal UniversityJinanChina

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