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Establishment and characterization of Caspian horse fibroblast cell bank in Iran

  • Abdolreza Daneshvar Amoli
  • Nazanin Mohebali
  • Parvaneh Farzaneh
  • Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh Fazeli
  • Laleh Nikfarjam
  • Sepideh Ashouri Movasagh
  • Zahra Moradmand
  • Meysam Ganjibakhsh
  • Ahmad Nasimian
  • Mehrnaz Izadpanah
  • Faezeh Vakhshiteh
  • Neda sadat Gohari
  • Najmeh sadat Masoudi
  • Maryam Farghadan
  • Shiva Mohamadi Moghanjoghi
  • Masoud Khalili
  • Kourosh J. Khaledi
Article

Abstract

Caspian horse, a rare horse breed found in 1965 by Louise Firouz in northern Iran, is a small horse which is reported to be in danger of extinction in its original homeland. There seems to be a great need to prevent extinction of this valuable horse. In this study, 51 fibroblast cell lines from Caspian horse ear marginal tissue were successfully established by sampling 60 horses using primary explant technique. Cells were authenticated and growth curve was plotted. According to results obtained, population doubling time (PDT) was calculated 23 ± 0.5 h for all cell lines. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multiplex PCR) revealed that cell lines had no cross-contamination with other species. Bacteria, fungi, and mycoplasma contamination were checked using standard methods such as PCR, direct culture, and Hoechst staining. In addition to providing a valuable source for genomic, postgenomic, and somatic cloning researches, the established cell lines would preserve Caspian horse genetic resources. It will also create an accessible database for researchers.

Keywords

Caspian horse Fibroblast cell line Conservation Cell banking 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors express their gratitude to Mirian, Afshar, Khojir and Guilan research complex staff, and Vaezi (private horse owner) for sample supply. We are also grateful to the Human and Animal cells bank staff for their contribution to this research. This research was supported by the Iranian Biological Resources Center (IBRC).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Society for In Vitro Biology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdolreza Daneshvar Amoli
    • 1
  • Nazanin Mohebali
    • 1
  • Parvaneh Farzaneh
    • 1
  • Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh Fazeli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Laleh Nikfarjam
    • 1
  • Sepideh Ashouri Movasagh
    • 1
  • Zahra Moradmand
    • 1
  • Meysam Ganjibakhsh
    • 1
  • Ahmad Nasimian
    • 1
  • Mehrnaz Izadpanah
    • 1
  • Faezeh Vakhshiteh
    • 1
  • Neda sadat Gohari
    • 1
  • Najmeh sadat Masoudi
    • 4
  • Maryam Farghadan
    • 1
  • Shiva Mohamadi Moghanjoghi
    • 1
  • Masoud Khalili
    • 5
  • Kourosh J. Khaledi
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Human and Animal Cell Bank, Iranian Biological Resource Center (IBRC), ACECRTehranIran
  2. 2.Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences and Advanced Technologies in BiologyUniversity of Science and CultureTehranIran
  3. 3.Department of Agriculture, Yadegar-e-Imam Khomeini (rah), Shahr-e- rey BranchIslamic Azad universityTehranIran
  4. 4.Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research CenterRoyan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECRTehranIran
  5. 5.Iran Equestrian FederationUniversity of Applied Science and TechnologyTehranIran

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