Exploring How Mindfulness Links to Work Outcomes: Positive Affectivity and Work-Life Enrichment

Abstract

As evidence accumulates about the link between mindfulness and well-being, organizational scholars have begun to ask how and why mindfulness results in positive change among employees. Drawing on Conservation of Resources Theory and Work-Family Enrichment Theory, we explored the underlying mechanisms that may explain the relationship between mindfulness and work outcomes. Using a community-based sample of 117 employed adults, we found evidence for a serial multiple mediation model of positive affectivity and work-life enrichment in the relationship between mindfulness and work outcomes (i.e., job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, turnover intentions). These results lend initial support for mindfulness as a psychological resource that helps employees accrue more positive work outcomes through higher positive affectivity and work-life enrichment. Practically speaking, this research suggests that mindful employees may be better equipped at leveraging positive affect, work-life enrichment, and work outcomes. As such, organizations may want to consider offering mindfulness interventions as one possible avenue for boosting employee resources.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported in part by a grant from the Summer Undergraduate Research Program at The College at Brockport, State University of New York.

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Correspondence to Laurel A. McNall.

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McNall, L.A., Tombari, J.M. & Brown, M.M. Exploring How Mindfulness Links to Work Outcomes: Positive Affectivity and Work-Life Enrichment. Applied Research Quality Life 16, 167–182 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-019-09762-9

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Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Positive affectivity
  • Enrichment
  • Turnover
  • Job satisfaction
  • Burnout