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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 1–14 | Cite as

Creative design inspired by biological knowledge: Technologies and methods

  • Runhua Tan
  • Wei Liu
  • Guozhong Cao
  • Yuan Shi
Open Access
Review Article
  • 330 Downloads

Abstract

Biological knowledge is becoming an important source of inspiration for developing creative solutions to engineering design problems and even has a huge potential in formulating ideas that can help firms compete successfully in a dynamic market. To identify the technologies and methods that can facilitate the development of biologically inspired creative designs, this research briefly reviews the existing biological-knowledge-based theories and methods and examines the application of biological-knowledge-inspired designs in various fields. Afterward, this research thoroughly examines the four dimensions of key technologies that underlie the biologically inspired design (BID) process. This research then discusses the future development trends of the BID process before presenting the conclusions.

Keywords

creative design biologically inspired methods key technologies 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper was sponsored by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51675159 and 51475137), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province of China (Grant No. E2015202029), China Scholarship Council and Hebei in the Graduate Student Innovation Ability Training Project.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the appropriate credit is given to the original author(s) and the source, and a link is provided to the Creative Commons license, indicating if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Runhua Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guozhong Cao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuan Shi
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringHebei University of TechnologyTianjinChina
  2. 2.National Engineering Research Center for Technological Innovation Method and ToolHebei University of TechnologyTianjinChina
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly

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