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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 143–157 | Cite as

Review of self-referenced measurement algorithms: Bridging lateral shearing interferometry and multi-probe error separation

  • Dede Zhai
  • Shanyong Chen
  • Ziqiang Yin
  • Shengyi Li
Review Article
  • 66 Downloads

Abstract

With the development of new materials and ultra-precision processing technology, the sizes of measured objects increase, and the requirements for machining accuracy and surface quality become more exacting. The traditional measurement method based on reference datum is inadequate for measuring a high-precision object when the quality of the reference datum is approximately within the same order as that of the object. Self-referenced measurement techniques provide an effective means when the direct reference-based method cannot satisfy the required measurement or calibration accuracy. This paper discusses the reconstruction algorithms for self-referenced measurement and connects lateral shearing interferometry and multi-probe error separation. In lateral shearing interferometry, the reconstruction algorithms are generally categorized into modal or zonal methods. The multi-probe error separation techniques for straightness measurement are broadly divided into two-point and three-point methods. The common features of the lateral shearing interferometry method and the multi-probe error separation method are identified. We conclude that the reconstruction principle in lateral shearing interferometry is similar to the two-point method in error separation on the condition that no yaw error exists. This similarity may provide a basis or inspiration for the development of both classes of methods.

Keywords

self-referenced measurement lateral shearing interferometry multi-probe error separation surface metrology 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51575520 and 51375488).

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dede Zhai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shanyong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ziqiang Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shengyi Li
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Mechatronic Engineering and AutomationNational University of Defense TechnologyChangshaChina
  2. 2.Hu’nan Key Laboratory of Ultra-precision Machining TechnologyChangshaChina

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