Development of the MIND: a Screening Measure Assessing Mental Health Treatment Needs

Abstract

Early identification and treatment of mental illness symptoms results in better outcomes, yet few screeners are available that can be efficiently used in community settings. The Mental Illness Needs Detection (MIND) Screener was developed to identify the need for mental health treatment and administered to 820 adults across the USA. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the internal consistency of the MIND. The MIND significantly correlated with the Kessler-10 (K10; a well-validated screener), reported mental illness, mental health treatment, and the need for treatment. The MIND’s ability to accurately assess treatment needs was further demonstrated through high sensitivity (84%; 83%), specificity (71%; 62%), and AUC values (0.77; 0.73) when compared to both the K10 and reported need for treatment, respectively. These findings support the validity and reliability of the MIND and indicate its promise as a means of detecting a wide range of mental health needs across a variety of settings.

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This work was supported by the Florida State University College of Medicine.

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Correspondence to Laura E. Hume PhD.

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Financial support for this project was provided, in part, from the Florida State University College of Medicine.

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Hume, L.E., Drew, C.H. & Cibrian, E. Development of the MIND: a Screening Measure Assessing Mental Health Treatment Needs. J Behav Health Serv Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-020-09745-x

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