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Journal of Computer Science and Technology

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 966–978 | Cite as

An Improved Evolvable Oscillator and Basis Function Set for Control of an Insect-Scale Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicle

  • John C. GallagherEmail author
  • Michael W. Oppenheimer
Regular Paper

Abstract

This paper introduces an improved evolvable and adaptive hardware oscillator design capable of supporting adaptation intended to restore control precision in damaged or imperfectly manufactured insect-scale flapping-wing micro air vehicles. It will also present preliminary experimental results demonstrating that previously used basis function sets may have been too large and that significantly improved learning times may be achieved by judiciously culling the oscillator search space. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the application of this adaptive, evolvable oscillator to full vehicle control as well as the consideration of longer term goals and requirements.

Keywords

evolvable and adaptive hardware micro air vehicle evolutionary algorithm 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York & Science Press, China 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringWright State UniversityDaytonU.S.A.
  2. 2.Control Sciences Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFBOhioU.S.A.

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