Distribution of C/N/P stoichiometry in suspended particulate matter and surface sediment in a bay under serious anthropogenic influence: Daya Bay, China

Abstract

The C/N/P stoichiometry of organic matter can provide useful information for better understanding of the effects of human activities on aquatic ecosystems. The Daya Bay is a semi-closed bay under serious anthropogenic influences in the southeastern China. This study investigated the contents and ratios of C, N, and P in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediment in Daya Bay during the spring of 2017. Average C/N/P ratios were 139/17/1 in the surface SPM, 129/16/1 in the bottom SPM, and 61/8/1 in the surface sediment. The C/N ratio of SPM was significantly lower in the western inner bay, suggesting that eutrophication can reduce this ratio. The N/P ratio of SPM was slightly higher in the inner bay, while no clearly distribution pattern was found in the C/P ratio of SPM. Compared with SPM, surface sediment showed significantly lower N/P and C/P ratios. The C/N, N/P, and C/P ratios and contents of total organic C, N, and P were higher in the surface sediment in the inner bay. Our results suggested that the distribution of C/N/P stoichiometry was uncoupled between SPM and surface sediment. The C/N/P stoichiometry of surface sediment can effectively reflect the regional variation of terrigenous input and the influence of nuclear power plant thermal effluent.

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Data Availability

The data and materials of this study will be available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to Dr. Shouhui Dai for his assistance in the elemental analysis.

Funding

This research was jointly funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31670458), the Key Special Project for Introduced Talents Team of Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Guangzhou) (GML2019ZD0401), the National Basic Research Program of China (2015CB452903), and the Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (2020B1212060058).

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Danting Chen: material preparation, sample and data analysis, and writing the original manuscript. Zhixin Ke: funding acquisition, filed investigation and sample analysis, and review and editing. Yehui Tan: review and editing and supervision.

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Correspondence to Zhixin Ke.

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Chen, D., Ke, Z. & Tan, Y. Distribution of C/N/P stoichiometry in suspended particulate matter and surface sediment in a bay under serious anthropogenic influence: Daya Bay, China. Environ Sci Pollut Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12812-1

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Keywords

  • Ecological stoichiometry
  • Redfield ratio
  • Thermal effluent
  • Eutrophication
  • Terrigenous organic matter