Effect of Se sources and concentrations on performance, antioxidant defense, and functional egg quality of laying Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the effect of Se sources and concentrations on performance, thyroid activity, antioxidant defense, and functional egg quality of Japanese quail. One hundred and twenty, 8-week-old birds were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments in 3 replicates (10 birds/replicate). The treatments contained inorganic sodium selenite (SS) at 0.2 mg/kg diet (SS1 = control) or 0.4 mg/kg diet (SS2) or selenomethionine (SM) at 0.2 mg/kg diet (SM1) or 0.4 mg/kg diet (SM2). Egg production (%) and feed intake were daily recorded, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) was calculated. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for glucose, thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes. Egg quality was determined in terms of Se content and concentrations of triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and cholesterol. Dietary supplementation of SM2 increased (P < 0.05) egg production (%) and egg mass and decreased FCR compared to the other groups, which showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in between. It is the first study reporting that the eggs from the quail fed SM2 diet had lower concentrations (P < 0.05) of triglycerides, LDL, and cholesterol than those fed SS. Feeding SM increased (P < 0.05) blood glucose, T4, and T3 levels. Moreover, feeding SM increased the activity of GPX and SOD with a higher significance (P < 0.05) for SM2 than SM1. In conclusion, no adverse effects from supplementation of SM up to 0.4 mg/kg were observed and could improve their performance, antioxidant defense, thyroid activity, and functional egg quality.

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Correspondence to Eldsokey Nassef.

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The experimental procedures were approved and performed according to the guidelines of the animal care and ethics committee of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kafrelsheikh University, Egypt.

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Nassef, E., Saker, O. & Shukry, M. Effect of Se sources and concentrations on performance, antioxidant defense, and functional egg quality of laying Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Environ Sci Pollut Res (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-09853-3

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Keywords

  • Selenomethionine
  • Performance
  • Egg quality
  • Antioxidant activity
  • Thyroid activity
  • Japanese quail