The Impact of Advancement Via Individual Determination on the College Readiness of First-Generation Hispanic Students in an Urban South Texas High School

Abstract

This study examined the phenomenon of college readiness in Hispanic first-generation college students. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between first-generation Hispanic student participation in an Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) elective course and college readiness. The researchers used logistic regression with a dependent variable, college readiness [measured by passing and failing scores on the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment in Reading, Writing and Math] and the predictor variables: AVID participation, Average T-scores of Advanced Placement, and Average T-scores of ACT and Dual Enrollment. Findings indicated that high school AVID elective course participation was a function of TSI Reading, Writing, and Math scores; however, middle school AVID elective course participation was not a function of these scores. The results highlight the importance of continued research on AVID participation and college readiness, particularly in the form of college placement exam scores such as the Texas Success Initiative.

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Correspondence to Karen M. Watt.

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Morley, W., Watt, K.M., Simonsson, M. et al. The Impact of Advancement Via Individual Determination on the College Readiness of First-Generation Hispanic Students in an Urban South Texas High School. Urban Rev 53, 145–163 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11256-020-00554-2

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Keywords

  • Advancement via individual determination
  • College readiness
  • First generation college students
  • Hispanic students