Growth performance, haematological responses, intestinal microbiology and carcass traits of broiler chickens fed finisher diets containing two-stage fermented banana peel meal

Abstract

The study investigated the effect of finisher diets containing two-stage fermented banana peel (FBP) meal on growth performance, haematological responses, intestinal microbiology and carcass traits of broilers. From days 22 to 38, 200 broiler chicks were grouped to maize-soybean meal–based finisher diet as a control (CONT) and finisher diets containing either 5% FBP (FBP-5), 10% FBP (FBP-10) or 15% FBP (FBP-15). Birds were blood sampled and slaughtered at day 38. For microbial population and villi height measurement, digesta and intestinal segments were collected. Breast meat was obtained for meat colour determination. Data collected were analysed according to analysis of variance followed by Duncan’s multiple-range test when there was significant effect. There was no effect of treatments on broiler growth performance. The relative duodenum weight tended (P = 0.08) to be lower in FBP than in CONT. The mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) was higher (P < 0.05) in FBP-5 than in CONT and FBP-15. Uric acid concentration was lower (P < 0.05) in FBP-10 and FBP-15 than in CONT. Feeding FBP tended (P = 0.08) to decrease coliform population in the ileum. Compared to CONT, the ileal villi heights were higher (P < 0.05) and lower (P < 0.05) in FBP-10 and FBP-5, respectively. The relative weight of thigh (P < 0.05) and wings (P = 0.07) were higher in CONT than in FBP-fed birds, but the eviscerated carcass was not different (P > 0.05) among groups. The lightness (L*) values of meat were higher (P < 0.05) in FBP-10 and FBP-15 than in CONT and FBP-5. Compared with others, breast meat from FBP-10 birds had lower (P < 0.05) redness (a*) values. In conclusion, dietary inclusion of FBP at the levels of up to 15% had no detrimental effect on growth and health performances of broiler chickens.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Anhwange, B.A., Ugye, T.J. and Nyiaatagher, T.D., 2009. Chemical composition of Musa sapientum (banana) peels, Electronic Journal of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 8, 437–442

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  2. Aureli, R., La-Marta, J., Grossia, A.B., Pia, E.A.D., Esteve-Garcia, E., Wulf-Andersena, L. and Thorsena, M., 2018. A novel glucuronoxylan hydrolase produced by fermentation is safe as feed additive: toxicology and tolerance in broiler chickens, Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 99, 213–224

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Blandon, J.C., Hamady, G.A.A. and Abdel-Moneim, M.A., 2015. The effect of partial replacement of yellow corn by banana peels with and without enzymes on broiler’s performance and blood parameters, Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences, 4, 10–19

    Google Scholar 

  4. Bogucka, J., Dankowiakowska, A., Elminowska-Wenda, G., Sobolewska, A., Szczerba, A. and Bednarczyk, M., 2016. Effects of prebiotics and synbiotics delivered in ovo on broiler small intestine histomorphology during the first days after hatching, Folia Biologica (Kraków), 64, 131–143

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Bolton, W., 1967. Poultry nutrition. MAFF Bulletin No.174, HMSO, London

  6. Chen, C.C., Shih, Y.C., Chiou, P.W.S. and Yu, V., 2010. Evaluating nutritional quality of single stage- and two stage-fermented soybean meal, Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Science, 23, 598–606

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Duwa, H., Saleh, B., Lamido, M. and Saidu, A., 2014. Growth, haematological and serum biochemical indices of broiler chickens fed banana peel meal as replacement for maize in the semi-arid zone of Nigeria, Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research, 4, 121–126

    Google Scholar 

  8. Fas, A., Adeyemi, O.A., Oluwole, O.B., Oladunmoye, O.O., Ayo-Ajasa, O.Y. and Anuoluwatelemi, J.O., 2015. Effects of treated banana peel meal on the feed efficiency, digestibility and cost effectiveness of broiler chickens diet, Journal of Veterinary Science & Animal Husbandry, 1, 1–6

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Hernawan, E. and Abun, 2014. Effect of banana peel application in ration on hematological level, nitrogen retention and body weight gain of heat exposed broiler chicken, Scientific Papers. Series D. Animal Science. 57, 101–107

    Google Scholar 

  10. Jeong, J.S. and Kim, I.H., 2014. Effect of Bacillus subtilis C-3102 spores as a probiotic feed supplement on growth performance, noxious gas emission, and intestinal microflora in broilers. Poultry Science, 93, 3097–3103

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Kaewthong, P., Waiyagan, K. and Wattanachant, S., 2017. Imaging analysis by digital camera for separating broiler breast meat with low water-holding capacity, Journal of Poultry Science, 54, 253–261

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Kasapidou, E., Sossidou, E. and Mitlianga, P., 2015. Fruit and vegetable co-products as functional feed ingredients in farm animal nutrition for improved product quality, Agriculture, 5, 1020–1034

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Koni, T.N.I., 2013. Effect of fermented banana peel on broiler carcass, Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science, 18, 153–157

    Google Scholar 

  14. Koni, T.N.I., Bale-Therik, J. and Kale, P.R., 2013. Pemanfaatan kulit pisang hasil fermentasi Rhyzopus oligosporus dalam ransum terhadap pertumbuhan ayam pedaging (article in Indonesian language), Jurnal Veteriner, 14, 365–370

    Google Scholar 

  15. Mukherjee, R., Chakraborty, R. and Dutta, A., 2016. Role of fermentation in improving nutritional quality of soybean meal—a review, Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 29, 1523–1529

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Oloruntola, O.D., Agbede, J.O., Onibi, G.E. and Igbasan, F.A., 2016. Replacement value of rumen liquor fermented cassava peels for maize in growing rabbit diet, Archivos de zootecnia, 65, 89–97

    Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Romelle, F.D., Rani, A. and Manohar, R.S., 2016. Chemical composition of some selected fruit peels, European Journal of Food Science and Technology, European Journal of Food Science and Technology, 4, 12–21

    Google Scholar 

  18. Sirajudin, Z.N.M., Ahmed, Q.U., Chowdhury, A.J.K., Kamarudin, E.Z., Khan, A.V., Uddin, A.B.M.H., Musa, N.A.S., 2014. Antimicrobial activity of banana (Musa paradisiaca L.) peels against food borne pathogenic microbes. Journal of Pure and Applied Microbiology, 8, 3627–3639

    Google Scholar 

  19. Siyal, F.A., Wagan, R., Bhutto, Z.A., Tareen, M.H., Arain, M.A., Saeed, M., Brohi, S.A. and Soomro, R.N., 2016. Effect of orange and banana peels on the growth performance of broilers. Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, 4, 376–380

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. SNI (Indonesian National Standard), 2006. Standard for Broiler Feed (SNI 01–3930-2006), National Standardization Agency of Indonesia, Jakarta

    Google Scholar 

  21. Sugiharto, S., Yudiarti, T., Isroli, I., Widiastuti, E. and Putra, F.D., 2017. Effect of dietary supplementation with Rhizopus oryzae or Chrysonilia crassa on growth performance, blood profile, intestinal microbial population, and carcass traits in broilers exposed to heat stress, Archives Animal Breeding, 60, 347–356

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Sugiharto, S., Yudiarti, T., Isroli, I. and Widiastuti, E., 2018a. The potential of tropical agro-industrial by-products as a functional feed for poultry, Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science, 8, 375–385

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  23. Sugiharto, S., Yudiarti, T., Isroli, I., Widiastuti, E., Wahyuni, H.I. and Sartono, T.A., 2018b. The effect of fungi-origin probiotic Chrysonilia crassa in comparison to selected commercially used feed additives on broiler chicken performance, intestinal microbiology, and blood indices, Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, 5, 332–342

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. Swennen, Q., Janssens, G.P.J., Millet, S., Vansant, G., Decuypere, E. and Buyse, J., 2005, Effects of substitution between fat and protein on feed intake and its regulatory mechanisms in broiler chickens: endocrine functioning and intermediary metabolism, Poultry Science 84, 1051–1057

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Villegas, P., 1987. Avian virus diseases laboratory manual. College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Wang, X., Farnell, Y.Z., Peebles, E.D., Kiess, A.S., Wamsley, K.G.S. and Zhai, W., 2016. Effects of prebiotics, probiotics, and their combination on growth performance, small intestine morphology, and resident Lactobacillus of male broilers, Poultry Science, 95, 1332–1340

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Weng, T.M. and Chen, M.T., 2011. Effect of two-step fermentation by Rhizopus oligosporus and Bacillus subtilis on protein of fermented soybean. Food Science and Technology Research, 17, 393–400

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Yamauchi, K.-E., Incharoen, T. and Yamauchi, K., 2010. The relationship between intestinal histology and function as shown by compensatory enlargement of remnant villi after midgut resection in chickens, Anatomical Record, 293, 2071–2079

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors thank PT. Bayer Indonesia (Jakarta, Indonesia) for providing the B. subtilis concentrate.

Funding

The study was fully supported by Diponegoro University through nontax state revenue (‘PNBP’), No. 385-83/UN7.P4.3/PP/2018, 17 May 2018.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sugiharto Sugiharto.

Ethics declarations

All applicable international, national and/or institutional guidelines for treating and handling of animals were followed in the current study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Additional information

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Sugiharto, S., Yudiarti, T., Isroli, I. et al. Growth performance, haematological responses, intestinal microbiology and carcass traits of broiler chickens fed finisher diets containing two-stage fermented banana peel meal. Trop Anim Health Prod 52, 1425–1433 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-019-02147-y

Download citation

Keywords

  • Broiler
  • Carcass
  • Fermented banana peel meal
  • Growth
  • Health