Mapping the Evolution of Social Research and Data Science on 30 Years of Social Indicators Research

Abstract

Social Indicators Research (SIR) year by year has consolidated its preeminent position in the debate concerning the study of all the aspects of quality of life. The need of a journal focused on the quantitative evaluation of social realities and phenomena dating back to the seventies, when a new branch of Social Science—called Social Indicators Research—came into the international scientific landscape. This paper aims at reviewing the whole collection of publications appeared on SIR from 1989 to 2018, providing a complete overview of the main factor that affected the journal in the last 30 years. The approach followed to analyse this extensive corpus of documents relies upon the theoretical framework of bibliometric studies.

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Notes

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    In an SCR scheme, entities with an equal value receive the same rank, then a gap equal to the number of entities ranked above is left in the ranking order.

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Aria, M., Misuraca, M. & Spano, M. Mapping the Evolution of Social Research and Data Science on 30 Years of Social Indicators Research. Soc Indic Res 149, 803–831 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-020-02281-3

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Keywords

  • Quality of life
  • Bibliometric analysis
  • Thematic analysis