Mapping collaboration in international coffee certification research

Abstract

This article aims to map scientific production and cooperation networks on the theme of certified coffee in the Scopus and Web of Science databases for the period from 2009 to 2019. To this end, bibliometric analysis tools are used—collaborative networks, co-citation, co-authorship and bibliographic coupling—on a set of 209 articles from Scopus and 306 articles from the Web of Science database. The results of this study allow us to conclude that although the scientific production on coffee and certification has increased in Scopus and Web of Science during the last decade, the research on the theme has a low prevalence of collaborative networks and is concentrated in a small number of journals. It is noteworthy that environmental and sustainability studies play a leading role, while there is a scarcity of studies in the economic area.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Fig. 1

Sources: Scopus (2019) and Web of Science (2019)

Fig. 2

Sources: Scopus (2019) and Web of Science (2019)

Fig. 3

Sources: Scopus (2019) and Web of Science (2019)

Fig. 4

Sources: Scopus (2019) and Web of Science (2019)

Fig. 5

Sources: Scopus (2019) and Web of Science (2019)

References

  1. Bacon, C. M., Ernesto Mendez, V., Gómez, M. E. F., Stuart, D., & Flores, S. R. D. (2008). Are sustainable coffee certifications enough to secure farmer livelihoods? The millenium development goals and Nicaragua's Fair Trade cooperatives. Globalizations,5(2), 259–274.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Balancieri, R., Bovo, A. B., Kern, V. M., Pacheco, R. C. D. S., & Barcia, R. M. (2005). An analysis of scientific collaboration networks under the new technologies of information and communication: a study in Lattes Platform. Ciência da Informação,34(1), 64–77.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Barabási, A. L., Jeong, H., Néda, Z., Ravasz, E., Schubert, A., & Vicsek, T. (2002). Evolution of the social network of scientific collaborations. Physica A: Statistical mechanics and its applications,311(3), 590–614.

    MathSciNet  Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Blackman, A., & Naranjo, M. A. (2012). Does eco-certification have environmental benefits? Organic coffee in Costa Rica. Ecological Economics,83, 58–66.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Blackman, A., & Rivera, J. (2011). Producer-level benefits of sustainability certification. Conservation Biology,25, 1176–1185.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Blackmore, E., Keeley, J., Pyburn, R., Mangus, E., Chen, L., & Yuhui, Q. (2012). Pro-poor certification: Assessing the benefits of sustainability certification for small-scale farmers in Asia. In Natural resource issues no. 25. London: IIED.

  7. Bray, J., & Neilson, J. (2017). Reviewing the impacts of coffee certification programmes on smallholder livelihoods. International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management,13(1), 216–232.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Clarivate Analytics. (2019). Retrieved from: https://clarivate.com/.

  9. Daviron, B., & Ponte, S. (2005). The coffee paradox: Global markets, commodity trade and the elusive promise of development. London: Zed Books.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Glänzel, W. (2001). National characteristics in international scientific coauthorship relations. Scientometrics,51(1), 69–115.

    MathSciNet  Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Glänzel, W., & Schubert, A. (2004). Analysing scientific networks through coauthorship. In H. F. Moed, W. Glänzel, & U. Schmoch (Eds.), Handbook of quantitative science and technology research (pp. 257–276). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Haggar, J., Soto, G., Casanoves, F., & Virginio, E. M. (2017). Environmental-economic benefits and trade-offs on sustainably certified coffee farms. Ecological Indicators,79, 330–337.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Hu, Z., Tian, W., Guo, J., & Wang, X. (2020). Mapping research collaborations in different countries and regions: 1980–2019. Scientometrics.

  14. Ibnu, M., Glasbergen, P., Offermans, A., & Arifin, B. (2015). Farmer preferences for coffee certification: A conjoint analysis of the indonesian smallholders. Journal of Agricultural Science,7(6), 20–35.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. International Coffee Organization. (2019). World coffee consumption 2019. Retrieved from: https://www.ico.org/prices/new-consumption-table.pdf.

  16. Jaffee, D. (2007). Brewing justice: Fair trade coffee, sustainability and survival. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Journal Citation Reports. (2019). Retrieved from: https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/solutions/journal-citation-reports/.

  18. Kasente, D. (2012). Fair trade and organic certification in value chains: Lessons from a gender analysis from coffee exporting in Uganda. Gender & Development,20, 111–127.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Kessler, M. M. (1963). Bibliographic coupling between scientific papers. American Documentation,14, 10–25.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. KPMG. (2013). Improving smallholder livelihoods: Effectiveness of certification in coffee, cocoa and cotton. Nevada: KPMG Advisory.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Lazaro, E. A., Makindara, J., & Kilima, F. T. M. (2008). Sustainability standards and coffee exports from Tanzania. DIIS Working Paper No 2008/1. Danish Institute for International Studies.

  22. Lenzen, M., Moran, D., Kanemoto, K., Foran, B., Lobefaro, L., & Geschke, A. (2012). International trade drives biodiversity threats in developing nations. Nature, 486(7401), 109–112.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Lima, S. H. O., & Leocádio, A. L. (2018). Mapeando a Produção Científica Internacional sobre Inovação Aberta. Revista Brasileira de Gestão e Inovação,5(2), 181–208.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. López-Fernández, M. C., Serrano-Bedia, A. M., & Pérez-Pérez, M. (2016). Entrepreneurship and family firm research: A bibliometric analysis of an emerging field. Journal of Small Business Management, 54(2), 622–639.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. National Science Foundation. (2018). Overview of the State of the U.S. S&E Enterprise in a Global Context. Science & Engineering Indicators 2018. Retrieved from: https://nsf.gov/statistics/2018/nsb20181/report/sections/overview/research-publications.

  26. Nature. (2019). Media Kit 2020. Retrieved from: https://partnerships.nature.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Springer-Nature-Media-Kit-2020.pdf.

  27. Panhuysen, S., & Pierrot, J. (2014). Coffee barometer 2014. Hivos, IUCNNL, Oxfam-Novib, Solidaridad, WWF.

  28. Renard, M. C. (2005). Quality certification, regulation and power in fair trade. Journal of Rural Studies,21, 419–431.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Ruben, R., Fort, R., & Zuniga-Arias, G. (2009). Measuring the impact of fair trade on development. Development in Practice,19, 777–788.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Ruggeri, G., Orsi, L., & Corsi, S. (2018). A bibliometric analysis of the scientific literature on Fairtrade labelling. International Journal of Consumer Studies,43, 134–152.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Scopus. (2019). Retrieved from: https://www.elsevier.com/pt-br/solutions/scopus.

  32. Small, H. (1973). Cocitation in the scientific literature: A new measure of the relationship between two documents. Journal of the American Society for Information Science,24, 265–269.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Smith, M. (1958). The trend toward multiple authorship in Psychology. American Psychologist,13, 596–599.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  34. Tahamtan, I., Afshar, A. S., & Ahamdzadeh, K. (2016). Factors affecting number of citations: a comprehensive review of the literature. Scientometrics,107(3), 1195–1225.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  35. UN Comtrade database (2018). Retrieved from: https://comtrade.un.org/db/mr/rfCommoditiesList.aspx?px=H2&cc=090111.

  36. Valkila, J. (2009). Fair trade organic coffee production in Nicaragua: Sustainable development or a poverty trap? Ecological Economics,68, 3018–3025.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  37. Van Eck, N. J., & Waltman, L. (2009). How to normalize cooccurrence data? An analysis of some well-known similarity measures. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology,60(8), 1635–1651.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  38. Van Eck, N. J., & Waltman, L. (2014). Visualizing bibliometric networks. In Y. Ding, R. Rousseau, & D. Wolfram (Eds.), Measuring scholarly impact: Methods and practice. London: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  39. Waltman, L., Van Eck, N. J., & Noyons, E. C. M. (2010). A unified approach to mapping and clustering of bibliometric networks. Journal of Infometrics,4(4), 629–635.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  40. Wagner, C. S., & Leydesdorff, L. (2005). Network structure, self-organization, and the growth of international collaboration in science. Research Policy,34, 1608–1618.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Funding

This work was partially funded by the National Postdoctoral Program of the Higher Education Personnel Improvement Coordination (PNPD/Capes), Fundação Araucária de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento Científico do Paraná and by the State University of Londrina, Dean of Research and Postgraduate, Office of Researcher Support.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Lilian Cervo Cabrera.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Cabrera, L.C., Caldarelli, C.E. & da Camara, M.R.G. Mapping collaboration in international coffee certification research. Scientometrics (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-020-03549-8

Download citation

Keywords

  • Value chain
  • Coffee growers
  • Certification
  • Bibliometrics

MSC Classification

  • 00A15
  • 00A72
  • 91C20

JEL Classification

  • Q02
  • Q13
  • Q18