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Scientometrics

, Volume 65, Issue 3, pp 357–379 | Cite as

Using categorisations of citations when assessing the outcomes from health research

  • Steve Hanney
  • Iain Frame
  • Jonathan Grant
  • Martin Buxton
  • Tracey Young
  • Grant Lewison
Article

Summary

This paper describes an attempt to explore how far a categorisation of citations could be used as part of an assessment of the outcomes from health research. A large-scale project to assess the outcomes from basic, or early clinical, research is being planned, but before proceeding with such a project it was thought important to test and refine the developing methods in a preliminary study. Here we describe the development, and initial application, of one element of the planned methods: an approach to categorising citations with the aim of tracing the impact made by a body of research through several generations of papers. The results from this study contribute to methodological development for the large-scale project by indicating that: only for a small minority of citing papers is the cited paper of considerable importance; the number of times a paper is cited can not be used to indicate the importance of that paper to the articles that cite it; and self-citations could play an important role in facilitating the eventual outcomes achieved from a body of research.

Keywords

Health Research Eventual Outcome Considerable Importance Small Minority Methodological Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Akadémiai Kiadó 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Hanney
    • 1
  • Iain Frame
    • 2
  • Jonathan Grant
    • 3
  • Martin Buxton
    • 4
  • Tracey Young
    • 5
  • Grant Lewison
    • 6
  1. 1.Health Economics Research Group, Brunel University
  2. 2.Policy Unit, Wellcome Trust
  3. 3.RAND Europe
  4. 4.Health Economics Research Group, Brunel University
  5. 5.Health Economics Research Group, Brunel University
  6. 6.Department of Information Science, City University

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