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Science & Education

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 1263–1281 | Cite as

The Minnesota Case Study Collection: New Historical Inquiry Case Studies for Nature of Science Education

  • Douglas Allchin
Article

Abstract

The new Minnesota Case Study Collection is profiled, along with other examples. They complement the work of the HIPST Project in illustrating the aims of: (1) historically informed inquiry learning that fosters explicit NOS reflection, and (2) engagement with faithfully rendered samples of Whole Science.

Keywords

Conceptual Change Alternate Current Smallpox Goose Barnacle Slow Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SHiPS Resource Center, Minnesota Center for the Philosophy of Science, and Department of Curriculum and InstructionUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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