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Russian Journal of Genetics

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 138–143 | Cite as

Analysis of the overexpression of a newly found gene toothrin in Drosophila

  • O. B. Simonova
  • D. A. Kulikova
  • I. B. Mertsalov
  • O. N. Umnova
  • V. N. Bashkirov
  • V. L. Buchman
  • L. I. Korochkin
General Genetics

Abstract

A newly found locus of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, named toothrin (tth) has been used to study the role of the conserved the 2/3 domain of genes from the d4 family. In contrast to all vertebrates studied (including humans), in which the 2/3 domain is always accompanied by the d4 domain, the tth gene contains the sequence encoding the 2/3 domain but lacks that encoding the d4 domain. The tth gene overexpression has been studied using the two-component system UAS-GAL4. It has been demonstrated that the tth overexpression at the third-instar larval (prepupal) stage decreases survival rate, simultaneously causing a substantial deceleration of development in Drosophila. It is known that the change of developmental stages in Drosophila is controlled by the rates of the expression of ecdysteroid and juvenile hormones (JHs). It is supposed that the overexpression of the tth gene causes either a shift in the ecdysterone-to-JH ratio (through a decreased JH decay rate or a delayed initiation of ecdysone synthesis) or a deceleration of the release of ecdysterones synthesized.

Keywords

Survival Rate Developmental Stage Decay Rate Juvenile Hormone Gene Overexpression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica” 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. B. Simonova
    • 1
  • D. A. Kulikova
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. B. Mertsalov
    • 1
  • O. N. Umnova
    • 3
  • V. N. Bashkirov
    • 1
  • V. L. Buchman
    • 1
    • 4
  • L. I. Korochkin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Gene BiologyRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Kol’tsov Institute of Developmental BiologyRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Moscow State Pedagogical UniversityMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Department of Preclinical VeterinaryUniversity of EdinburghSummerhall, EdinburghScotland, UK

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