Advertisement

Russian Chemical Bulletin

, Volume 54, Issue 8, pp 1793–1797 | Cite as

On the emitters of sulfuric acid sonoluminescence

  • G. L. Sharipov
  • A. M. Abdrakhmanov
  • R. Kh. Gainetdinov
Article

Abstract

A comparative study of the sonoluminescence spectra of water and argon-saturated aqueous H2SO4 solutions was carried out. At an H2SO4 concentration of 18 mol L−1, the sulfuric acid sonoluminescence is fifty times more intense than water sonoluminescence. The sulfuric acid luminescence spectrum differs from the water sonoluminescence spectrum caused by the emission of excited water molecules and OH radicals from the gas phase of cavitation bubbles. The sulfuric acid sonoluminescence spectrum exhibits maxima at 330, 420, 500, and 630 nm. Emitters of sonoluminescence of sulfuric acid are the singlet (330–340 nm) and triplet (∼420 nm) excited SO2 molecules formed by sonolysis of H2SO4 molecules. Another product of sonolysis of H2SO4, atomic oxygen, is assumed to be responsible for the luminescence at λ = 630 nm.

Key words

sonoluminescence aqueous solution sulfuric acid sulfur dioxide 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. A. Margulis, Usp. Fiz. Nauk, 2000, 170, 263 [Physics-Uspekhi, 2000, 43, 259 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. V. Nikonov and V. P. Shilov, Izv. Akad. Nauk, Ser. Khim., 1994, 1150 [Russ. Chem. Bull., 1994, 43, 1087 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. V. Nikonov and V. P. Shilov, Izv. Akad. Nauk, Ser. Khim., 1997, 1555 [Russ. Chem. Bull., 1997, 46, 1489 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. V. Nikonov and V. P. Shilov, Zh. Fiz. Khim., 1991, 3085 [Russ. J. Phys. Chem., 1991, 40 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    C. Sehgal, R. G. Sutherland, and R. E. Verrall, J. Phys. Chem., 1980, 84, 529.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. L. Sharipov, A. M. Abdrakhmanov, and R. Kh. Gainetdinov, Izv. Akad. Nauk, Ser. Khim., 2003, 1863 [Russ. Chem. Bull., Int. Ed., 2003, 52, 1966].Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Yu. T. Didenko, D. N. Nastich, S. P. Pugach, Yu. A. Polovinka, and V. I. Kvochka, Zh. Fiz. Khim., 1994, 68, 2080 [Russ. J. Phys. Chem., 1994, 68 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    C. Sehgal, R. G. Sutherland, and R. E. Verrall, J. Phys. Chem., 1980, 84, 388.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    L. T. Bugaenko, Kh. Guan'-Lin', and N. A. Bakh, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 1963, 149, 1099 [Dokl. Chem., 1963 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. A. Robinson and R. H. Stokes, Electrolyte Solutions, Butterworths Sci. Publ., London, 1959.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Y. G. Jin, H. C. Zhou, M. Suto, and L. C. Lee, J. Photochem. Photobiol., A, Chem., 1990, 52, 255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    H. Okabe, Photochemistry of Small Molecules, Wiley, New York, 1981, 504 pp.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    L. T. Bugaenko, M. G. Kuz'min, and L. S. Polak, Khimiya vysokikh energii [High-Energy Chemistry], Khimiya, Moscow, 1988, p. 213 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    I. P. Vinogradov and F. I. Vilesov, Opt. Spektrosk. [Opt. Spectrosc.], 1976, 40, 58 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    M. A. Margulis, Yu. A. Korneev, S. V. Demin, and V. S. Verbanov, Zh. Fiz. Khim., 1994, 68, 923 [Russ. J. Phys. Chem., 1994, 68 (Engl. Transl.)].Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    M. A. Margulis, Zvukokhimicheskie reaktsii i sonolyuminestsentsiya [Sonochemical Reactions and Sonoluminescence], Khimiya, Moscow, 1986, p. 124 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Yu. T. Didenko, S. P. Pugach, and T. V. Gordeichuk, Opt. Spektrosk. [Opt. Spectrosc.], 1996, 80, 913 (in Russian).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Sharipov
    • 1
  • A. M. Abdrakhmanov
    • 1
  • R. Kh. Gainetdinov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Petrochemistry and CatalysisRussian Academy of SciencesUfaRussian Federation

Personalised recommendations