Analysis of Five Junior High School Physics Textbooks Used in China for Representations of Nature of Science

Abstract

Based on the analytical framework of nature of science (NOS) in junior school science textbooks, a content analysis method was adopted to analyze the NOS in junior middle school physical textbooks (grade 8) of five editions authorized by the Ministry of Education of China, and the features of NOS were analyzed and compared. It was found that all five textbooks presented poor representations of NOS. None of these five editions were scientifically objective, nor did they include discussions of scientific laws and theories. Furthermore, they rarely presented empirical evidence to support their arguments. The explicit representations of NOS were particularly inadequate.

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Acknowledgement

The authors gratefully acknowledge the support provided by the Education Science Program of Shaanxi Province (SGH16B008), National Social Science Foundation of China (14ZDB160) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (71704116).

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Correspondence to Jingying Wang.

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Appendix

Appendix

Table 3 The contents were selected for analysis from various publishers’ eighth grade physics textbooks

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Li, X., Tan, Z., Shen, J. et al. Analysis of Five Junior High School Physics Textbooks Used in China for Representations of Nature of Science. Res Sci Educ 50, 833–844 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-018-9713-z

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Keywords

  • Junior High School Physics Textbooks
  • Textbook evaluation
  • Nature of science content analysis method