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International Review of Education

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 283–285 | Cite as

Why multimodal literacy matters: (Re)conceptualizing literacy and wellbeing through singing-infused multimodal, intergenerational curricula

By Rachel Heydon and Susan O’Neill. Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, 2016, 156 pp. ISBN 978-94-6300-707-8 (hbk), ISBN 978-94-6300-706-1 (pbk), ISBN 978-94-6300-708-5 (eBook)
  • Terry A. Campbell
Book Review
  • 67 Downloads

Rachel Heydon and Susan O’Neill’s Why multimodal literacy matters: (Re)conceptualizing literacy and wellbeing through singing-infused multimodal, intergenerational curricula presents an intriguing interweaving of several complex concepts, as the title indicates. In this book, the authors describe their research working with groups at each extreme of the intergenerational divide, namely elders and young children, who are brought together by singing together. Ambitiously, Heydon and O’Neill strive to show how singing, a sonic mode, is an underappreciated but vital dimension of multimodal literacy – one that is uniquely connected to meaning making and identity, and, thus, to wellbeing.

This review asks first of all, does this work contribute to our present understandings of multimodal literacy?1 Secondly, do the authors succeed in showing why multimodal literacy matters? Further, how is this connected to wellbeing? To answer these overarching questions, the review provides an overview of...

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature, and UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Schulich School of EducationNipissing UniversityNorth BayCanada

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