Advertisement

International Journal for Philosophy of Religion

, Volume 80, Issue 3, pp 259–278 | Cite as

Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, and the problem of first immediacy

  • Chandler D. Rogers
Article
  • 822 Downloads

Abstract

Manifold expressions of a particular critique appear throughout Søren Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous corpus: for Kierkegaard and his pseudonyms faith is categorically not a first immediacy, and it is certainly not the first immediate, the annulment of which concludes the first movement of Hegelian philosophy. Kierkegaard’s pseudonyms make it clear that he holds the Hegelian dogmaticians responsible for the promulgation of this misconception, but when Kierkegaard’s journals and papers are consulted another transgressor emerges: the renowned anti-idealist F.D.E. Schleiermacher. I address the extent to which this particular indictment is justified; over-against Gerhard Schreiber, I argue that this characterization of Schleiermacher’s view of religion is indeed a de facto critique. I begin by presenting and demonstrating the ubiquity of the phenomenon at the heart of Schleiermacher’s conception of perfect God-consciousness, then proceed to apply criticisms raised by Kierkegaardian pseudonyms Judge William, Vigilius Haufniensis, Johannes Climacus, and Anti-Climacus, supplemented with concerns raised by Kierkegaard himself, in order to demonstrate that these criticisms do indeed apply to and problematize Schleiermacher’s view.

Keywords

Gefühl German romanticism The present Experiential expressivism 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Uche Anizor and Andy Draycott for their comments on very early drafts of this essay, Garrett Bredeson and Mandel Cabrera for their comments during our discussion after I presented an early draft at the Southwest Seminar in Continental Philosophy in May of 2015, and Elizabeth A. Murray and an anonymous review for their feedback on this draft.

References

  1. Anz, W. (1985). Schleiermacher und Kierkegaard: Übereinstimmung und Differenz. Zeitschrift für Theologie und Kirche, 82(4), 409–429.Google Scholar
  2. Bailly, J. C. (2011). The animal side. New York: Fordham University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Crouter, R. (1994). Kierkegaard’s not so hidden debt to Schleiermacher. Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschicte, 1(2), 205–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Crouter, R. (2006). More than kindred spirits: Schleiermacher and Kierkegaard on repentance. In T. Jørgensen, C. Dieter Osthövener, & N. J. Cappelcørn (Eds.), Schleiermacher und Kierkegaard: Subjektivität und Warheit (pp. 673–686). Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  5. Crouter, R. (2007). Schleiermacher: Revisiting Kierkegaard’s relationship to him. In J. Stewart (Ed.), Kierkegaard and his german contemporaries—Tome II: Theology. Kierkegaard research: Sources, reception and resources, (Vol. 6, pp. 197–222). Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited.Google Scholar
  6. Dillard, A. (1974). Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics.Google Scholar
  7. Kierkegaard, S. (1970). Søren Kierkegaard’s journals and papers: F-K. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), (Vol. 2). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Kierkegaard, S. (1974). Either/or (W. Lowrie, Trans.) (Vol. II). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Kierkegaard, S. (1975). Søren Kierkegaard’s journals and papers: L-R. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), (Vol. 3). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Kierkegaard, S. (1978). Søren Kierkegaard's journals and papers: autobiographical, part one: 1829–1848. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), (Vol. 5). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Kierkegaard, S. (1981). The concept of anxiety: A simple psychologically orienting deliberation on the dogmatic issue of hereditary sin. Kierkegaard’s writings VIII. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Kierkegaard, S. (1983a). Fear and trembling/repetition. Kierkegaard’s writings VI. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Kierkegaard, S. (1983b). The sickness unto death. Kierkegaard’s writings XIX. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Kierkegaard, S. (1985). Philosophical fragments and Johannes Climacus. Kierkegaard’s writings VII. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Kierkegaard, S. (1987). Either/or. Kierkegaard’s writings IV.2. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), (Vol. II). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Kierkegaard, S. (1990). For self-examination/judge for yourselves. Kierkegaard’s writings XXI. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Kierkegaard, S. (1992). Concluding unscientific postscript to the philosophical fragments. Kierkegaard’s writings XII.1. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), (Vol. I). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Kierkegaard, S. (1993). Purity of heart is to will one thing. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.), Upbuilding discourses in various spirits. Kierkegaard’s writings XV. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Kierkegaard, S. (1995). Works of love. Kierkegaard’s writings XVI. In H. Hong & E. Hong (Eds.). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Kierkegaard, S. (2007). Journals AA-DD. Kierkegaard’s journals and notebooks. In N. J. Cappelørn, A. Hannay, D. Kangas, B. H. Kirmmse, G. Pattison, V. Rumble, and B. Søderquist, (Eds.), (Vol. 1). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Kirmmse, B. H. (1996). Encounters in Kierkegaard: A life as seen by his contemporaries. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Lowrie, W. (1942). A short life of Kierkegaard. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Mariña, J. (2004). Schleiermacher on the outpourings of the inner fire: Experiential expressivism and religious pluralism. Religious Studies, 40(2), 125–143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Rogers, C. D. (2015). From the shadows of Mt. Moriah: Approaching faith in fear and trembling. Religious Studies and Theology, 34(1), 41–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Rogers, C. D. (2016). Schleiermacher in the Kierkegaardian project: Between socratic ignorance and second immediacy. Kierkegaard studies yearbook 21(1), 141–158.Google Scholar
  26. Schleiermacher, F. (1928). The christian faith. Edinburgh: T&T Clark.Google Scholar
  27. Schleiermacher, F. (1958). On religion: speeches to its cultured despisers. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  28. Schleiermacher, F. (1963). The christian faith. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  29. Schreiber, G. (2011). The real targets of Kierkegaard’s critique of characterizing faith as “the immediate”. Acta Kierkegaardiana, 5, 137–167.Google Scholar
  30. Schreiber, G. (2013). Kierkegaard’s account of faith as “the new immediacy”. Filozofia, 68(1), 27–37.Google Scholar
  31. Schröer, H. (1985). Wie verstand Kierkegaard Schleiermacher? In K. V. Selge (Ed.), Internationaler Schleiermacher-Kongreß Berlin 1984 (Vol. II, pp. 1147–1155). Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Westphal, M. (2003). Kierkegaard and the role of reflection in second immediacy. In P. Cruysberghs, J. Taels, & K. Verstrynge (Eds.), Immediacy and reflection in Kierkegaard’s thought. Leuven: Leuven University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Wyman, W. E, Jr. (1994). Rethinking the christian doctrine of sin: Friedrich Schleiermacher and Hick’s “irenaean type”. The Journal of Religion, 74(2), 199–217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Loyola Marymount UniversityLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations