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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 231–239 | Cite as

Validation of a pediatric oral health-related quality of life scale in Navajo children

  • Patricia A. Braun
  • Kimberly E. Lind
  • William G. Henderson
  • Angela G. Brega
  • David O. Quissell
  • Judith Albino
Article

Abstract

Background

American Indian (AI) children experience the highest rates of early childhood caries (ECC) in the USA, yet no tool has been validated to measure the impact of ECC on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL).

Objective

To validate a pediatric OHRQoL scale in a preschool, rural, reservation-based AI population.

Methods

In 2011 and 2012, we measured the OHRQoL of AI children attending Head Start in Navajo Nation with the 12-item preschool version of the pediatric oral health-related quality of life (POQL) scale administered to their parents/caregivers. Parents/caregivers also reported their children’s subjective oral health status (OHS) and oral health behavior adherence. Concurrently, calibrated dental examiners measured the children’s decayed, missing, and filled tooth surfaces (dmfs). Validation was assessed with internal reliability and convergent and divergent validity testing and exploratory factor analyses.

Results

We measured the outcomes in 928 caregiver-child dyads. All children were AI and in preschool [mean (SD) child age was 4.1 (0.5) years]. The majority of children had experienced decay [dmfs: 89 %, mean (SD): 21.5 (19.9)] and active decay [any ds: 70 %, mean (SD): 6.0 (8.3)]. The mean (SD) overall POQL score was 4.0 (9.0). The POQL scale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha = 0.87). Convergent validity of the POQL scale was established with highly significant associations between POQL and caries experience, OHS, and adherence to oral health behaviors (all ps < 0.0001).

Conclusions

The POQL scale is a reliable and valid measure of OHRQoL in preschoolers from the Navajo Nation.

Keywords

Early childhood caries Oral health-related quality of life American Indian Validation Psychometrics Severe early childhood caries 

Abbreviations

AI

American Indian

AI/AN

American Indian/Alaska Native

ECC

Early childhood caries

dmfs

Decayed, missing, filled surfaces

OHRQoL

Oral health-related quality of life

OHS

Oral health status

POQL

Pediatric oral health-related quality of life

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding for the study was provided by the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research (U54 DE019259-03, Albino). The findings and conclusions are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institutes of Health. We would like to thank the Navajo Tribe as well as the participants who gave so graciously of their time. We would like to thank Lucinda Bryant for her assistance with revising this manuscript and Carmen George and Nikola Toledo for their tireless work in Navajo Nation. Finally, we are grateful for the technical assistance provided by Michelle Henshaw and Sharron Rich at Boston University.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia A. Braun
    • 1
  • Kimberly E. Lind
    • 2
    • 3
  • William G. Henderson
    • 1
    • 4
  • Angela G. Brega
    • 2
  • David O. Quissell
    • 5
  • Judith Albino
    • 2
  1. 1.Children’s Outcomes Research, Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramsUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA
  2. 2.Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Systems, Management and PolicyUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA
  4. 4.Department of Biostatistics and InformaticsUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA
  5. 5.Department of Craniofacial Biology, School of Dental MedicineUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA

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