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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 1165–1170 | Cite as

Relationship between health-related quality of life and clustering of metabolic syndrome diagnostic components

  • Sayuri Katano
  • Yasuyuki Nakamura
  • Aki Nakamura
  • Yoshimi Suzukamo
  • Yoshitaka Murakami
  • Taichiro Tanaka
  • Akira Okayama
  • Katsuyuki Miura
  • Tomonori Okamura
  • Shunichi Fukuhara
  • Hirotsugu Ueshima
Brief Communication

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the association of the number of metabolic syndrome diagnostic components (MetS-DC) with health-related quality of life (HR-QOL).

Methods

We examined the baseline data from 4,480 healthy workers in Japan (3,668 men and 812 women) aged 19–69 years. We assessed HR-QOL based on scores for five scales of the SF-36. We defined four components for MetS in this study as follows: (1) high blood pressure (BP); (2) dyslipidemia; (3) impaired glucose tolerance; and (4) overweight: a body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for lifestyle factors was used to examine the association of the number of MetS-DC with the HR-QOL sub-scales.

Results

Those who had 0–4 MetS-DC accounted for 2,287, 1,135, 722, 282, and 54 participants. The number of MetS-DC inversely contributed significantly to General Health (norm-based scoring >50) (odd ratios [OR] 0.59–0.82, P < 0.05) and positively associated with Mental Health (OR 1.37, P < 0.05).

Conclusion

When adjusted for lifestyle factors, the number of MetS-DC was inversely associated with General Health and positively with Mental Health in men and women.

Keywords

Metabolic syndrome Diagnostic components Health-related quality of life SF-36 

Abbreviations

MetS

Metabolic syndrome

MetS-DC

Metabolic syndrome diagnostic components

BP

Blood pressure

IGT

Impaired glucose tolerance

HR-QOL

Health-related quality of life

GH

General Health

MH

Mental Health

RP

Role-Physical

RE

Role-Emotional

HIPOP-OHP

The high-risk and population strategy for occupational health promotion (study)

CVD

Cardiovascular diseases

BMI

Body mass index

MET

Metabolic equivalent

IPAQ

The International Physical Activity Questionnaire

SF-36

Short-Form 36

NBS

Norm-based scoring

HDL

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by research grants from the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan (H10-12, No. 063, Research on Health Services, Health Sciences Research Grants and H13, No. 010, Medical Frontier Strategy Research, Health Sciences Research Grants), the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare of Japan (H14-15, No. 010, Clinical Research for Evidence-Based Medicine, Health, and Labor Sciences Research Grants), and the Japan Arteriosclerosis Prevention Fund 2004. We thank Toshimi Yoshida, Shiga University of Medical Science, for her excellent clerical support during this research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sayuri Katano
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Nakamura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aki Nakamura
    • 1
  • Yoshimi Suzukamo
    • 3
  • Yoshitaka Murakami
    • 4
  • Taichiro Tanaka
    • 5
  • Akira Okayama
    • 6
  • Katsuyuki Miura
    • 2
  • Tomonori Okamura
    • 7
  • Shunichi Fukuhara
    • 8
  • Hirotsugu Ueshima
    • 2
  1. 1.Cardiovascular EpidemiologyKyoto Women’s UniversityHigashiyama-ku, KyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Health ScienceShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Medical StatisticsShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan
  5. 5.Department of Health Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and EngineeringUniversity of YamanashiChuoJapan
  6. 6.First Institute of Health ServiceJapan Anti-Tuberculosis AssociationTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Department of Preventive CardiologyNational Cardiovascular CenterSuitaJapan
  8. 8.Department of Epidemiology and Healthcare ResearchKyoto University Graduate School of MedicineKyotoJapan

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