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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 731–738 | Cite as

Quality-of-life outcome after hallux valgus surgery

  • Carlos Saro
  • Irene Jensen
  • Urban Lindgren
  • Li Felländer-Tsai
Article

Abstract

Objective

To assess the quality of life before and after hallux valgus surgery.

Methods

A longitudinal study with 94 consecutive patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery. Assessments were made preoperatively and at 12 month postoperatively. Measures used were the quality of life (QoL) according to SF-36, a disease specific score (the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society’s clinical rating system for the hallux), the severity of the deformity, the possibility of wearing the preferred choice of shoes and satisfaction with the treatment. The pre- and postoperative QoL scores were compared with the score in the general population.

Results

QoL outcomes improved significantly postoperatively regarding bodily pain, vitality, mental health and the mental component summary. The correction of the deformity did not affect the QoL. Regardless of the extent of correction, the choice of shoeware and the degree of satisfaction with surgery were associated with a better QoL.

Conclusions

Hallux valgus patients have worse pain than the general population. Surgery produces a significant improvement in the quality of life. The severity of the deformity did not influence the QoL, however; the free choice of shoeware and the degree of satisfaction with the surgery had a positive effect on the QoL outcome. SF-36 is a relevant tool for evaluating outcome in hallux valgus surgery.

Keywords

Hallux valgus Quality of life Shoeware Surgery 

Abbreviations

AOFAS

American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

DMAA

distal metatarsal articular angle

HVA

Hallux valgus angle

IMA

Intermetatarsal 1–2 angle

QoL

Quality of life

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded in part by a grant from the Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet. The authors wish to thank Helena Bertilsson, Section for Personal Injury Prevention, at the Karolinska Institutet, for the statistical analyses.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Saro
    • 1
  • Irene Jensen
    • 2
  • Urban Lindgren
    • 1
  • Li Felländer-Tsai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Division of OrthopaedicsKarolinska Institute at Karolinska University HospitalStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Section for Personal Injury PreventionKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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