Breaking second glass ceiling: lived experiences of women entrepreneurs in Pakistan

Abstract

The glass ceiling is a well-recognized phenomenon in the corporate sector thwarting aspirant women to gain senior management positions. It is an indiscernible barrier and a strong ceiling blocking women moving up in the management hierarchy. This paper, however, explores the existence of the second glass ceiling for women entrepreneurs who escaped the corporate world to start their businesses but are trapped by another glass ceiling. This research mainly explores the existence of a second glass ceiling for women entrepreneurs and the ways they used to get through it. This study is conducted for an in-depth understanding and uses the phenomenological approach. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with women entrepreneurs of Lahore. This paper apart from explaining the second glass ceiling also finds solutions to break it.

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Correspondence to Qaisar Khalid Mahmood.

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Salahuddin, A., Mahmood, Q.K. & Ahmad, A. Breaking second glass ceiling: lived experiences of women entrepreneurs in Pakistan. Qual Quant (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-021-01119-5

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Keywords

  • Glass-ceiling
  • Women entrepreneurs
  • Gender bias
  • Economic participation