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Quality & Quantity

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 237–255 | Cite as

Inclusion and education in European countries: methodological considerations

  • George Muskens
Article

Abstract

In this paper, the author intends to explain the comparative challenges of a research project and the methodological grounding and justification of the research conclusions. The research project regarded an assignment of the European Commission to assess inclusion measures in primary and secondary education in 10 European countries, i.e. France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the UK (Contract 2007-2094/001 TRA-TRSPO). National as well as comparative reports were submitted to the Commission in August 2009 and accepted for further publication in October 2009. The present paper will concentrate on the methodological issues and considerations. It will demonstrate that the conclusions were grounded and justified from a methodological perspective, applying an appropriate mix of quantitative and qualitative methods, notwithstanding serious limitations and restrictions.

Keywords

Comparative educational research Comparative assessment Educational indicators Case studies Pupils at (high) risks Inclusion Exclusion Educational policies Europe 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.INTMEAS – Inclusion and education in European countriesDOCA BureausHalsterenThe Netherlands

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