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Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 76, Issue 4, pp 351–360 | Cite as

Psychiatric Interventions with Returning Soldiers at Walter Reed

  • Harold Wain
  • John Bradley
  • Theodore Nam
  • Douglas Waldrep
  • Stephen Cozza
Article

Abstract

War is a malefic force and results in many psychiatric and medical casualties. Psychiatry's involvement with soldiers experiencing psychological stress resulting from combat experience has been reported for many years (Zajtchuk, 1995). It has been demonstrated that a myriad of diagnosis to include depression, anxiety, somatoform, adjustment disorders and psychotic behaviors also emerge (Wain et al., 1996, 2005a). Nearly all survivors exposed to traumatic events briefly exhibit one or more stress related symptoms (Morgan et al., 2003). In many instances these symptoms dissipate within a reasonable amount of time. However, symptoms persisting for a prolonged period following a traumatic event increase the probability of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders.

KEY WORDS

psychiatric intervention trauma casualties 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold Wain
    • 1
  • John Bradley
    • 1
  • Theodore Nam
    • 1
  • Douglas Waldrep
    • 1
  • Stephen Cozza
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryWalter Reed Army Medical CenterWashington

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