Physical literacy praxis: A theoretical framework for transformative physical education

Abstract

This article aims to propose a theoretical framework, based on the literature, that supports the growth of students’ physical literacy in physical education. The framework features a trained educator who seeks to establish a positive climate for learning based on the creation of a positive culture of movement. It features meaningful student experiences, empowers students and staff, and integrates curriculum. Critical attributes from physical literacy theory are seamlessly integrated and nurtured in all four domains: physical, cognitive, behavioral, and affective.

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Gleddie, D.L., Morgan, A. Physical literacy praxis: A theoretical framework for transformative physical education. Prospects 50, 31–53 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-020-09481-2

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Keywords

  • Physical literacy
  • Education
  • Physical education
  • Teachers