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PROSPECTS

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 427–448 | Cite as

Primary and secondary curriculum development in Afghanistan

  • Dakmara Georgescu
Open File

Abstract

The article analyzes curriculum processes and products pertaining to the overall reconstruction of Afghanistan’s education system after 2002. With the support of several international agencies, including UNESCO’s International Bureau of Education (IBE), as well as non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Afghanistan’s Ministry of Education succeeded in making important progress with regard to quality education, curriculum planning and design. Based on a careful analysis of needs, new curriculum frameworks for primary and secondary education were developed over the period 2002–2006, and syllabuses and textbooks for primary and secondary education will be developed and disseminated in schools across the country. However, many challenges remain to be tackled, especially with regard to the dissemination of a new curriculum culture and the writing, printing and distribution of quality syllabuses and textbooks at all education levels. The article highlights both the achievements and the obstacles standing in the way of comprehensive curriculum reforms taking place in the difficult context of reconstructing a cohesive societal infrastructure in a country, such as Afghanistan, that is affected by conflict.

Keywords

Educational reconstruction Capacity development Curriculum framework 

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UNESCO-IBEGeneva 20Switzerland

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