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Albert Vinicio Baez and the promotion of science education in the developing world 1912–2007

  • Fernando Reimers
Profile of Educators

Alberto Vinicio Baez was a pioneer in the field of international science education. He was a physicist who played a leading role in UNESCO’s efforts to support science education globally. His research in the physics of light led to the development of an X-ray microscope and of imaging optics. He participated in projects to improve science education in high schools in the United States in the 1950s, a period of intense interest on this topic.

In 1961 he was invited to join UNESCO to establish the Division of Science Education. In this position he wrote numerous papers, organized and participated in regional and international conferences, and studied and supported the development of projects to advance science and technology education in developing countries, with a special focus in secondary schools. The programme established the importance of science education, developed low-cost science kits, films and a structured, high-quality curriculum to support physics teachers in Latin America,...

Keywords

Social Responsibility Science Education Instructional Material Improve Science Education Moral Clarity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

Albert V. Baez’s works on science education in chronological order

  1. Baez, A. V. (1967a). Improving the teaching of science with particular reference in developing countries. New York, NY: United Nations Economic and Social Council Advisory Committee on the Application of Science and Technology to Development. (Doc. STD/8/1A and Corr.1, 10 October 1967). (Available from ERIC: ED 033 050.).Google Scholar
  2. Baez, A. V. (1967b). The new college physics: a spiral approach. San Francisco, CA: W.H. Freeman.Google Scholar
  3. Baez, A. V., & Jinapala, A. (1973). Integrated science teaching as part of general education. In P. E. Richmond (Ed.), New trends in integrated science teaching (Vol. 2, pp. 167–175).Google Scholar
  4. Baez, A. V. (1971). Aims, contents, methodology in science teaching. In P. Gillon & H. Gillon (Eds.), Science and education in developing states. New York, NY: Praeger.Google Scholar
  5. Baez, A. V. (1974) International science education. Science, new series, 184(4135).Google Scholar
  6. Baez, A. V. (1976). Innovation in science education worldwide. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  7. Baez, A. V. (1988). Experiences in media-activated instruction. AIP Conference Proceedings, 173, 320–324.Google Scholar
  8. Baez, A. V. (1989). The early days of X-ray optics: a personal memoir. Journal of X-ray Science and Technology, 1(1), 3–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Baez, A. V. (1997). Anecdotes about the early days of X-ray optics. Journal of X-ray Science and Technology, 7(2), 90–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Albert V. Baez’s articles on optics and physics in chronological order

  1. Braxton, W. L., Baez, A. V., & Kirkpatrick, P. (1945). Absolute intensity of Kα-radiation from a thick target. Proceedings of the American Physical Society, published in Physical review, 63(3/4).Google Scholar
  2. Kirkpatrick, P., & Baez, A. V. (1947). Absolute energies of Kα-radiation from thick targets of silver. Physical Review, 71, 521–529.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Baez, A. V. (1948). Fermat’s principle and certain minimum problems. The American Mathematical Monthly, 55(5), 316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kirkpatrick, P., & Baez, A. V. (1948). Formation of optical images by X-rays. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 38, 766.Google Scholar
  5. Kirkpatrick, P., & Baez, A. V. (1948). Geometrical optics of grazing incidence reflectors. Physical Review, 73, 417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Baez, A. V. (1952). Resolving power in diffraction microscopy with special reference to X-rays. Nature, 169, 963.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Baez, A. V. (1952). A study in diffraction microscopy with special reference to X-rays. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 42, 756.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Elsum, H. M. A., & Baez, A. V. (1955). Preliminary experiments on X-ray microscopy by reconstructed wave fronts. Physical Review, 99, 624.Google Scholar
  9. Baez, A. V. (1956). Is resolving power independent of wavelength possible? An experiment with a sonic macroscope. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 46, 901.Google Scholar
  10. Baez A. V. (1960). A proposed X-ray telescope for the 1- to 100-A region. Journal of Geophysical Research, 65, 3019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Baez, A. V. (1960). Orbiting image-forming telescopes for extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 50, 1127.Google Scholar
  12. Baez, A. V. (1960). Self-supporting metal Fresnel zone-plate to focus extreme ultra-violet and soft X-rays. Nature, 186, 958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Baez, A. V. (1961). Fresnel zone plate for optical image formation using extreme ultraviolet and soft X-radiation. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 51, 405.Google Scholar

References

  1. Baez, A. V. (1967a). Improving the teaching of science with particular reference in developing countries. New York, NY: United Nations Economic and Social Council Advisory Committee on the Application of Science and Technology to Development. (Doc. STD/8/1A and Corr.1, 10 October 1967). [Available from ERIC: ED 033 050.].Google Scholar
  2. Baez, A. V. (1967b). The new college physics: a spiral approach. San Francisco, CA: W.H. Freeman.Google Scholar
  3. Baez, A. V. (1974). International science education. Science, New Series, 184(4135).Google Scholar
  4. Baez, A. V. (1976). Innovation in science education worldwide. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  5. Baez, A. V. (1987). Education and conservation strategy. In A. V. Baez, G. W. Knamiller, & J. C. Smith (Eds.), Science and technology education and future needs. Vol. 8: The environment and science and technology education. Oxford, UK: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  6. Baez, A. V., & Alles, J. (1973). Integrated science teaching as part of general education. In P. E. Richmond (Ed.), New trends in integrated science teaching (Vol. 2, pp. 167–175).Google Scholar
  7. Davis, M. (1990). Mexican voices: American dreams. New York, NY: Henry Holt.Google Scholar
  8. Duschl, R. (2000). Making the nature of science explicit. In R. Millar, J. Leech, & J. Osborne (Eds.), Improving science education: The contribution of research (pp. 187–200). Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Gore, A. (2006). An inconvenient truth: The planetary emergency of global warming and what we can do about it. New York, NY: Rodale Publishers.Google Scholar
  10. Maybury, R. 2007. From model, to colleague, to friend: honoring the memory of Albert V. Baez (1913–2007). <http://auhighlights.blogspot.com/2007/03/from-model-to-colleague-to-friend.html>. Retrieved 24 Jan 2008.
  11. National Research Council. (2007). Taking science to school: Learning and teaching science in Grades K-8. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  12. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development—OECD. (2003). Trends in international mathematics and science study. <http://nces.ed.gov/timss/>. Retrieved 9 Feb 2008.
  13. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development—OECD. (2008). programmeme for international student assessment. <http://www.pisa.oecd.org/pages/0,3417,en_32252351_32235907_1_1_1_1_1,00.html>. Retrieved 9 Feb 2008.
  14. Torres Bodet, J. (1949). Torres Bodet reaffirms streamlined action of UNESCO. UNESCO courier, May. <http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0007/000739/073970eo.pdf>. Retrieved 9 Feb 2008.

Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard Graduate School of EducationCambridgeUSA

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