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Public Organization Review

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 359–373 | Cite as

Participation in Decentralized Local Governance: Two Contrasting Cases from the Philippines

  • Risako Ishii
  • Farhad Hossain
  • Christopher J. Rees
Article

Abstract

Contrary to the popular assumptions among international donor agencies, preceding studies have questioned the causal relations between decentralization, participation and pro-poor policy outcomes. This article introduces two cases of decentralized city governments in the Philippines: one employs radical forms of civil participation, while the other introduces modest ones, but both of them have been successfully launching pro-poor policies. Through referring these contrasting cases to a “participatory governance” model and a “governance with trusts” model, the paper argues that the approach to local governance is not linear.

Keywords

Decentralization Local governance Participation Pro-poor policy Development aid The Philippines 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We would like to express our gratitude to the Center of Regional and Local Governance (CLRG), University of the Philippines, as well as the city governments of Naga City and Marikina City, for their kind cooperation in interview surveys conducted for this article.

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Interviews

  1. Aguilar, T. C. Jr. 2007. Marikina City planning and development officer. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Marikina City, the Philippines, 19 June.Google Scholar
  2. Bordado, G. H. Jr. 2007. Naga City Vice Mayor. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Naga City, the Philippines, 21 June.Google Scholar
  3. Cruz, M. A. 2007. Marikina City Administrator. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Marikina City, the Philippines, 15 June.Google Scholar
  4. de la Rosa, J. 2007. Board of Director, NCPC. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Naga City, the Philippines, 21 June.Google Scholar
  5. de Leon, L. E. 2007. Marikina City Council Secretary. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Marikina City, the Philippines, 14 June.Google Scholar
  6. Francisco, E. C. 2007. Representative of Business Sector, ISA. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Marikina City, the Philippines, 15 June.Google Scholar
  7. Mendoza, F. M. 2007. Naga City Budget Officer. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Naga City, the Philippines, 21 June.Google Scholar
  8. Obispo, J. S. 2007. Marikina City Personnel Officer. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Marikina City, the Philippines, 14 June.Google Scholar
  9. Prilles, W. B., Jr. 2007. Naga City Planning and Development Coordinator. Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Naga City, the Philippines, 21 June.Google Scholar
  10. Tam-Mongoso, F. Jr. 2007. Department Head, Metro Naga Public Employment Service Office (PESO). Personal interview by Risako Ishii. Naga City, the Philippines, 21 June.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Risako Ishii
    • 1
  • Farhad Hossain
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Rees
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM), School of Environment and DevelopmentUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK

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