Population Research and Policy Review

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 197–199 | Cite as

Introduction to the special ACS issue of population research and policy review

Original Paper


This article presents a brief history of the American Community Survey's development. It also provides an overview of the structure and content of this special issue of Population Research and Policy Review.


American community survey ACS development 


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As with any special publication, there are many people who contribute in one way or another. My thanks go to each one of them, whether I mention them here by name or not. First of all, I wish to thank David Swanson for initially organizing this issue and providing the guidance necessary to pull it all together on time. Second, each of the authors is to be thanked for their work in preparing and revising the papers as necessary to produce this high quality special issue. Third, thanks go to each of the anonymous reviewers of each of the papers. Fourth, the effort put in by Springer ’s staff in providing copyediting and the other services necessary to actually produce this issue are very greatly appreciated. Finally, the authors and I dedicate this special issue to the memories of Chip Alexander and Leslie Kish.


  1. Alexander, C. (2001). Still rolling: Leslie Kish’s “rolling samples” and the American Community Survey, Proceedings of Statistics Canada Symposium 2001. Ottawa ON: Statistics Canada.Google Scholar
  2. Kish, L. (1981). Using cumulated rolling samples to integrate census and survey operations of the Census Bureau. Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  3. Melnick, D. (1991). The census of 2000 A.D. and beyond. In Reviews of major alternatives for the census in the year 2000 (pp. 60–74). Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Empire State DevelopmentAlbanyUSA

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