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Population and Environment

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 243–274 | Cite as

Cognitive Models of Fertility Decline in Oaxaca City, Mexico

  • David P. Kennedy
Article

Abstract

This paper presents a systematic analysis of the “culture of natality.” In the first section, I present an extended definition of culture informed by cognitive anthropology and evolutionary biology. I argue that culture is an adaptation and a virtual environment with which humans must interact in order to survive and reproduce in a given physical environment. In the second section, I present a qualitative and quantitative analysis of qualitative interview data collected in Oaxaca City, Mexico, on reproductive behavior. The analysis examines evidence of cultural differences and similarities. I conclude by discussing implications for a theory of fertility decline.

culture theory fertility decline qualitative and quantitative methods Oaxaca text analysis 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Carolina Population CenterUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill

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