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Physical Oceanography

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 142–152 | Cite as

Investigation of the mechanism of the long-term evolution of the carbon cycle in the ecosystem of the Sevastopol bay

  • O. G. Moiseenko
  • N. A. Orekhova
Article

We analyze the components of the carbon system of the Sevastopol bay waters and the balance of main sediment-forming substances using the data of field investigations in 1998–2008. The interannual variations of total inorganic carbon and the equilibrium partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the bay water are noted. An increase in the flux of carbon dioxide into the bay and in the content of organic carbon in bottom sediments is revealed, and an explanation of this phenomenon is given. The priority accumulation of organic carbon in the sediments of the bay is established. We assess the interannual variation in the relative abundances of organic and inorganic carbon as an index of the carbon cycle stability.

Keywords

carbon cycle components of the carbon system Sevastopol bay 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marine Hydrophysical Institute of the Ukrainian Academy of SciencesSevastopolUkraine

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