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Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 54, Issue 5–6, pp 253–258 | Cite as

Phase Formation During Nitriding of Vanadium Disilicide

  • L. A. Krushinskaya
  • G. N. Makarenko
  • A. V. Kotko
  • I. V. Uvarova
THEORY, MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY, AND PROPERTIES OF POWDERS AND FIBERS
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The evolution of microstructural and phase transformations during nitriding of mechanically preactivated vanadium disilicide powder is investigated by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. It is established that, in the initial stage of nitriding (1000–1100°C), the phase formation is accompanied by the dispersion of near-surface zones of VSi2 particles and the formation of V2N and α-modification silicon nitride. With increase in the nitriding temperature, the phase formation is accompanied by the delamination of particles and the formation of mainly VN and silicon nitride of α- and α-modifications. Nitriding of a mechanically activated vanadium disilicide powder at 1400°C enables synthesizing a fine silicon nitride–vanadium nitride composite powder in a single process. The synthesized powder is formed as loose aggregates consisting of 50 nm particles.

Keywords

phase formation composite powder silicon nitride vanadium disilicide nitriding nanoparticles aggregates 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Krushinskaya
    • 1
  • G. N. Makarenko
    • 1
  • A. V. Kotko
    • 1
  • I. V. Uvarova
    • 1
  1. 1.Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials ScienceNational Academy of Sciences of UkraineKievUkraine

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