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Thermodynamic analysis of the formation and decomposition of intermetallic hydrides

  • T. I. Bratanich
Article
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The formation and decomposition of LaNi5H6, TiFeH2, Ti2NiH, TiNiH2, Ti2CuH2.7, TiCuH, Ti3AlH3, Mg2NiH4, Mg2CuH3, and ZrMn2.8H4 intermetallic hydrides are thermodynamically analyzed in identical conditions. These reactions are competitive and the interface between them is determined by boundary composition \( {{\text{A}}_x}{{\text{B}}_y}{{\text{H}}_{{n_{\text{b}}}}} \). For LaNi5, TiFe, Mg2Ni, and ZrMn2.8, intermetallides, ranges of stable hydrogenation are equal to 17, 27, 5, and 17% of the maximum hydrogen capacity, and the others are ranges of metastable hydrides, over which decomposition reactions are limited kinetically. The improvement in kinetics of intermetallide hydrogenation prevents the decomposition of intermetallic hydrides. This is promoted by mechanical or catalytic activation of hydrogenation and by the use of heat-conducting nonvolatile metal matrix composites based on intermetallides.

Keywords

intermetallic hydride hydrogenation hydride decomposition 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of UkraineKievUkraine

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