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Pituitary

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 75–81 | Cite as

Retinal nerve fiber layer changes after transsphenoidal and transcranial pituitary adenoma resection

  • Nidan Qiao
  • Zhao Ye
  • Ming Shen
  • Xuefei Shou
  • Yongfei Wang
  • Shiqi Li
  • Min Wang
  • Yao Zhao
Article

Abstract

Purpose

Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) will show retrograde degeneration following damage to the optic nerve or the optic tract in patients with pituitary adenoma. RNFL changes after surgery have not been studied thoroughly in patients with the transsphenoidal surgery and patients with the transcranial surgery.

Methods

Thirty-seven patients with pituitary adenoma were recruited from Huashan hospital between September 2010 and July 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: the transsphenoidal group and the transcranial group. Before surgery, 3 and 9 months after surgery, follow-up optic coherence tomography were conducted.

Results

Twenty-one patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery and 16 patients underwent transcranial surgery. No obvious difference were observed between these two groups before surgery. The mean RNFL thickness did not change significantly in patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery: 91.1 before surgery, 92.7 at 3 months after surgery (p = 0.392) and 92.8 at 9 months after surgery (p = 0.395). The mean RNFL thickness decreased in patients who underwent transcranial surgery: 93.6 before surgery, 86.1 at 3 months after surgery (p = 0.000) and 88.1 at 9 months after surgery (p = 0.005).

Conclusions

In the short time follow-up, there was no change of RNFL thickness in pituitary adenoma patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery, but a decrease in patients underwent transcranial surgery.

Keywords

SAP RNFL Visual function Surgery 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nidan Qiao
    • 1
  • Zhao Ye
    • 1
  • Ming Shen
    • 1
  • Xuefei Shou
    • 1
  • Yongfei Wang
    • 1
  • Shiqi Li
    • 1
  • Min Wang
    • 2
  • Yao Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai Pituitary Tumor Center, HuaShan Hospital, Shanghai Medical CollegeFuDan UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Ophthalmology, Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiChina

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