Exploring Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter phytochemical diversity to explain its antimicrobial, nematicidal and insecticidal activity

Abstract

Dittrichia viscosa is a perennial small shrub belonging to the Compositae family (Asteraceae) widespread in the Mediterranean basin. This plant has been extensively used in traditional medicine since the Roman times as reported by the Roman Naturalist Gaius Plinius Secundus. Nowadays, many studies about chemical composition and biological activity of D. viscosa are available. Chemical analyses of plant extracts revealed the presence of several metabolites belonging to different classes of natural products such as sesquiterpenes, flavonoids and caffeic acids. In addition, the essential oil of D. viscosa is rich in volatile short chain metabolites with aldehydes, alcohols and esters functional groups, as well as long chain fatty acids esters and alkyls. Some of these compounds are known for their biological activities against a wide range of micro- and macroorganisms. Scientific evidence reported that derivates of caffeic acids and flavonoids were the compounds mainly related to inhibition of bacterial and fungal growth, whereas sesquiterpene lactones and eudesmane sesquiterpenes were most active against nematodes, mites, insects and parasitic plants. In this paper, information about the phytochemical composition and the biological activity of D. viscosa against bacteria, fungi, nematodes, mites, insect and parasitic plants have been summarized.

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Fig. 1

Abbreviations

DMSO:

Dimethyl sulfoxide

HPLC:

High performance liquid chromatography

IR:

Infrared spectroscopy

MIC:

Minimal inhibitory concentration

MPLC:

Medium pressure liquid chromatography

MS:

Mass spectrometry

NMR:

Nuclear magnetic spectroscopy

TLC:

Thin layer chromatography

UV:

Ultraviolet

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Correspondence to Virginia Lanzotti.

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Grauso, L., Cesarano, G., Zotti, M. et al. Exploring Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter phytochemical diversity to explain its antimicrobial, nematicidal and insecticidal activity. Phytochem Rev 19, 659–689 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11101-019-09607-1

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Keywords

  • Antibacterial
  • Antifungal
  • Flavonoids
  • Nematode
  • Plant disease
  • Sesquiterpenoids
  • Tomentosin