Advertisement

Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 355–372 | Cite as

Disjunctivism unmotivated

  • Gordon Knight
Article

Abstract

Many naive realists are inclined to accept a negative disjunctivist strategy in order to deal with the challenge presented by the possibility of phenomenologically indistinguishable hallucination. In the first part of this paper I argue that this approach is methodologically inconsistent because it undercuts the phenomenological motivation that underlies the appeal of naive realism. In the second part of the paper I develop an alternative to the negative disjunctivist account along broadly Meinongian lines. In the last section of this paper I consider and evaluate a somewhat similar but rival view of hallucination developed by Mark Johnston.

Keywords

Disjunctivism Perception Phenomenology Hallucination Non-existent objects Mark Johnston 

References

  1. Armstrong, D. M. (1961). Perception and the physical world. New York: The Humanities Press.Google Scholar
  2. Azzouni, J. (2010). Talking about nothing: numbers, hallucinations, and fictions. Oxford: Oxford. University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Butchvarov, P. (1979). Being qua being: a theory of identity, existence, and predication. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Campbell, J. (2002). Reference and consciousness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Crane, T. (2001). Elements of mind: an introduction to the philosophy of mind. Oxford: Oxford. University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Fish, W. (2009). Perception, hallucination, and illusion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Jackson, F. (1975). “On the adverbial analysis of visual experience.” Metaphilosophy, 6, 27–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Johnston, M. (2006). “Better than Mere Knowledge? The Function of Sensory Awareness.” In G. Tamar & H. John (Eds.), Perceptual experience. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Johnston, M. (2009). “The Obscure Object of Hallucination.” In A. Byrne & H. Logue (Eds.), Disjunctivism: contemporary readings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Martin, M. G. F. (2006). “On Being Alienated.” In G. Tamar & H. John (Eds.), Perceptual experience. Oxford: Oxford University press.Google Scholar
  11. Martin, M. G. F. (2009). “The Limits of Self-awareness.” In A. Byrne & H. Logue (Eds.), Disjunctivism: contemporary readings. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  12. McGinn, C. (2000). Logical properties. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Meinong, A. (1960). “The Theory of Objects” trans. In L. Issac, D. B. Terrell, & C. Roderick (Eds.), Realism and the background to phenomenology. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  14. Parsons, T. (1980). Nonexistent objects. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Pautz, A. (2010). “Why Explain Visual Experience in Terms of Content.” In B. Nanay (Ed.), Perceiving the world. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Priest, G. (2005). Towards non-being: the logic and metaphysics of intentionality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Robinson, H. (1994). Perception. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Smith, A. D. (2002). The problem of perception. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Snowdon, P. (2009). “The Objects of Perceptual Experience.” In A. Byrne & H. Logue (Eds.), Disjunctivism: contemporary readings. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  20. Soteriou, M. (2005). The subjective view of experience and its objective commitments. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 105, 177–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Valberg, J. J. (1992). The puzzle of experience. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Valberg, J. J. (2007). Dream, death, and the self. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and Religious StudiesIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

Personalised recommendations